Archive for the ‘King’ Tag

Martin Luther King: The Man who had a Dream: MLK Day (US), 20 January 2014   5 comments

Martin Luther King leaning on a lectern. Deuts...

Martin Luther King leaning on a lectern. Deutsch: 1964: Martin Luther King Português: Martin Luther King (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The third Monday in January is marked as a federal holiday in the United States, in memory and recognition of the Civil Rights activist and President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia on 15 January 1929 and died in hospital on 4 April 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee, from an assassin’s bullet which struck him as he walked outside his hotel room. He married Coretta Scott King in 1953 and they had four children, one of whom, Dexter Scott King, manages the King Center in Atlanta. Rev. Jesse Jackson, who was with Dr King when he died, twice stood for election as President. Later he worked for President Clinton, who in 1998 gave the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Rosa Parks, who had sparked the Civil Rights Movement into action by her simple act in 1955, of refusing to give up her seat to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama, . Her arrest and subsequent imprisonment led to a mass boycott of the public buses in the city coordinated by the NAACP, the black civil rights group, with King, then a local Baptist minister in the city. When she met Nelson Mandela in 1990, he told her of how her brave action often inspired him during his long imprisonment. However, Dr King’s dream has not yet come true. Blacks and whites are not yet equal, except in law, and large numbers of young black Americans have grown up without jobs, since the 1980’s, in cities like Chicago, where President Obama worked in social programs at that time. Many went to prison, or died in street violence from shootings and stabbings which are part of the gang warfare of the cities. Five times as many blacks are victims of this violence than are whites, and the proportions of black prisoners to whites is roughly similar.

Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King.

Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The advent of a ‘colored’ man to the White House does not, yet, seem to have had much effect. Perhaps President Obama’s new-found determination to tackle the problem of gun ownership will have an impact on these figures. However, there are still less than 60% of blacks registered to vote.

For thirteen years, Martin Luther King was the leader of a people on a long road to freedom. He was a great speaker, preacher and writer, and his philosophy and strategy of non-violent direct action, inspired by Mahatma Gandhi, has, in turn inspired many civil rights movements and campaigns throughout the world. In 2005 Condoleezza Rice succeeded Colin Powell as the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, the first two African-Americans to hold senior office in the Federal government.  At a meeting in Black History Month, she talked about what Dr King’s ideas meant to her:

Black Americans, African-Americans, have always believed in America, even in the darkest times. They believed in America when America didn’t believe in them. Martin Luther King told America that it should be true to itself. And finally America did the right thing by African-Americans. 

I have put together a PPP here, which can be accessed via the link below. It can be used by students working in English, at intermediate level (with about a thousand words) and above.

Martin Luther King

https://chandlerozconsultants.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/martin-luther-king.pptng

Printed Sources:

Alan C McLean, Martin Luther King: Oxford Bookworms Factfiles. OUP: 2008

Malkoc, Smolinski & Kral (eds.), Celebrate! Holidays in the USA. Office of English Language Programs (englishprograms.state.gov), Washington DC: 2007 (second edn.)

Martin Luther King, Strength to Love. London (Hodder & Stoughton): 1964

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When did we meet the King? Sheep to the Left, Goats to the Right!   1 comment

Photo

 

Above: An illustration from The Last Battle by C S Lewis

Below: A Picture from The Greatest Gift: The Story of Artaban, The Fourth Wise Man

Matthew 25 v 31 – 26 v 5

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I wrote the following ‘paraphrase’ after listening to a sermon on this passage in my local (Hungarian) Baptist Church on Sunday. It made me reflect on the words of Jesus and the point of this parable in relation to recent news from various countries. The parable is often used to point to the need for each Christian to take action to help the poor and needy in society, but it seems to me that it’s really more concerned with the responsibility of ‘the nations’ for the poor among them, with the need for us to take collective responsibility for the poor, the sick, the immigrants and the prisoners among us. Viewed in this light it has a fresh, revolutionary meaning for me this Christmas, as well as reminding me of the self-sacrifice of Artaban in the story pictured above. The fourth wise man never gets to see either the infant or the adult King, because he stops to help a sick man as he begins his journey to Bethlehem. At the end of the story, though he is a ‘stranger’ with an oriental religion, he is received into heaven by the ‘Shepherd King’ with the words spoken to the righteous sheep.

“All the nations were gathered before the Shepherd King, who sat on his throne with his great crook and separated out the sheep from the goats. He shepherded the sheep to their left, his right, and blessed them, giving them each a share in his inheritance from his father. They became his ‘Righteous’, for, as he told them:

When I was hot and thirsty, at the height of summer, you gave me a free water bottle. When I was hungry, you invited me to the soup kitchen in the town square. When I was a poor immigrant, you helped me find a job and a place to live, and helped me settle in. When I was on my own, sleeping on the street, you invited me to Christmas lunch at your church. When I was freezing cold, because I had no winter coat, you gave me your old sheepskin coat, which you had donated to a charity. When I was so ill in bed that I could not get up, you came to care for me until I recovered. When I was in prison, you organised a Christmas Party for me and the other inmates.

Pleased, yet puzzled, ‘the Righteous’ asked him:

When did we meet you as an immigrant and invite you in, or gave you a coat, or visited you when you were sick or in prison?

The King replied:

I tell you the truth. Though you had little power, whenever you ministered to our poor and destitute brothers and sisters, you ministered to me.

Then he turned to those on his left, who thought they were among the Righteous. They included government ministers and Members of Parliament, including some bishops. He told them:

You always set yourselves above the people you were chosen to minister to, and in so doing you have set yourselves apart from me. You have chosen your own way, which is different from mine, so your can continue on that way forever. For when I was thirsty, you removed the fountains from the public parks, so I would have nothing to drink there. When I was hungry, because of your policies, you refused to support the food banks set up by the charities to help poor families. When I was an immigrant, looking for honest work, you refused to give me a work permit, even though you had agreed in the Assembly of Nations that you would. When I was freezing on the streets in the Bleak Midwinter, you sent the police to caution me for vagrancy and then had me arrested and sent before the magistrate. She sent me to prison, with the murderers and rapists. At least there I was warm and had a roof over my head, but then you threw me back out on the streets, with no place to go, not even a stable. When I was injured, I found you had closed the local accident and emergency unit, so I had to walk five miles to the nearest hospital. I couldn’t make it, and had no money to call an ambulance, so I died of pneumonia on the way. 

They also asked when they had met the King as a thirsty or starving man, or as an immigrant, or as a destitute and injured man, and he answered:

Now I will speak truth to power: You are supposed to be ministers of the state and church, but whenever you failed to minister to the people who gave you power over them, you failed to minister to me.

So the chief minister recalled their Assembly, and they returned to their palace, where they debated how to arrest the King, put him on trial, and execute him without causing a revolution among the growing number of poor their policies had created. They would have to wait until after Christmas was over, so they agreed to meet again in the New Year, and went home to their own mansions for the holiday, determined to ignore the poor in their constituencies.”

English: People eating at a soup kitchen. Mont...

English: People eating at a soup kitchen. Montreal, Canada Français : Personnes mangeant dans une soupe populaire. Montréal, Canada. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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