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A Suffolk Market Town: Framlingham – a Graphical History Tour.   Leave a comment

 

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Location, Population & Administration:

Framlingham is located in SuffolkFramlingham is an English market town and civil parish in East (‘Coastal’) Suffolk (shown on the right). Of Anglo-Saxon origin, it is mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book. In the 1960s, Framlingham had a population of about 2,300 which had grown to 3,342 at the 2011 Census. Nearby villages include Earl Soham, Kettleburgh, Parham, Saxtead and Sweffling.

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In 2006, Country Life magazine voted Framlingham the best place to live in the country, despite having no rail connection. The Framlingham Branch line connected the town with the main Ipswich to Lowestoft railway at Wickham Market in the 1850s, eventually becoming part of the Great Eastern Railway Company in 1862. The railway station building stands adjacent to the Station Hotel, but the line was closed to passenger traffic in the 1950s and to goods in the 1960s. The nearest working stations are now at Wickham Market and Saxmundham, on the East Suffolk line, seven and eight miles away. The town is in the Central Suffolk and North Ipswich constituency of the UK Parliament and the East England constituency of the European Union (at least until 31 October 2019). It is eighty-eight miles from London, nineteen from Ipswich, eleven from Woodbridge and thirty-two from Bury St. Edmunds. The main parish church is ‘St. Michael the Archangel’ and the parish stretches north-east to Brundish with a total ward population of 4,744.

Below: The Road Network around Framlingham today

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The name ‘Framlingham’ is probably derived from the Saxon ‘Freynlingham’ meaning ‘Settlement of the Strangers’, referring to the Danes, but it could also be simply named after the river flowing through the town, formerly called the ‘Fromus’, but now known as the ‘Ore’ which has its outlet on the Suffolk Coast, some twenty miles away. Below Marlesford the river unites with the Alde and the combined stream flows past Aldeburgh and then Orford on its way to the sea. It is a matter for speculation as to just how the town grew but it seems fairly safe to conclude that as long as the castle was a place requiring defence no house would be allowed to be built where it would be an advantage to an attacker. However, since St. Michael’s Church was, it seems, in existence from early times and it would afford a sheltered area to the south and west and geographically ‘over the hill’ from the castle. Archaeological investigations in the 1950s have exposed where most of the older buildings lie. There is also little doubt that the dismantling of the interior of the castle in the early seventeenth century gave a great impetus to building in the town. Some of the beams now in houses in Southwold are said to have come from Framlingham Castle.

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The medieval castle is a major feature of the town, recently honoured by the singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran in his song, ‘Castle on the Hill’. Like his fellow-singer, Laura Wright, Sheeran went to the local comprehensive, ‘Thomas Mills High School’, which began life as a special school for girls on Fairfield Road called the ‘Mills Grammar School for Girls’. There is also an independent school, ‘Framlingham College’ which was built in 1865 as a memorial to Prince Albert, then the late Prince Consort. The money was raised by public subscription, so it was appropriate that to celebrate its centenary a very fine hall was built, the ‘Athlone Hall’, for the use of both the College and the local community. The local ‘Robert Hitcham Primary School’, now a Church of England Voluntary school, is the oldest school in the town, dating back to at least 1654. Originally erected under Sir Robert Hitcham’s Will, it was located over the Market Cross on Market Hill. In about 1788, the Cross was taken down and the school was rebuilt at the end of the Hitcham almshouses. At first, the number of pupils was limited to forty, as set by Sir Robert, but in 1837 the number was increased and in 1841 a school for girls was created by using one of the rooms in the castle. In 1862 both these schools and that created under the Mills Trust were handed over to the Charity Commissioners who united them in 1878, in a school built on the ‘White Horse Meadow’ where the primary school stands today.

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The town has the two oldest functioning Post Office pillar boxes in the UK, dating from 1856, located on Double Street and College Road respectively. The town is also home to one of the smallest houses in Britain, known as the ‘Check House’, converted to a two-storey residence of less than twenty-nine square metres, the ground floor measuring just 6.1 metres by 2.21.

A Chronology of Events:

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Saxons, Danes & Normans (865-1154):

From the beginning of the ninth century, the Viking warlords probed the strengths and weaknesses of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until in 865 they came to stay. Ivan the Boneless and his brother Halfdene landed on the Suffolk coast at the head of the ‘great heathen army’. The terrified Anglo-Saxons fell back before the invaders. Their East Anglian King, Edmund sought peace and by the terms of the treaty, the Danes were allowed to winter in Suffolk and assured of horses to carry their baggage. Edmund’s speedy capitulation may have lacked valour but it saved his people much suffering. In the Spring, Edmund’s people watched with sighs of relief as their unwanted guests departed westwards to attack Northumbria and Mercia. But they returned in 869 laden with spoil, flushed with triumph and heedless of former treaties. They wintered at Thetford and used it as a base from which to ravage the farms and, especially the monasteries of East Anglia. Edmund could not honourably allow this Viking rampage to go unchecked. He came forth to do battle with the heathen invaders and thus an otherwise insignificant king became a martyr, a saint and a legend. Pious legends, well-sprinkled with miracles and signs, are our only source of information for the campaign of 869, but we know that there was a great battle fought near Thetford. According to Roger of Wendover, the battle lasted from dawn till dusk, till the stricken field was red with the blood of the countless numbers who perished. 

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Edmund, it would seem, won the day, but not long afterwards we find him and his bodyguard besieged in the Saxon fort at Framlingham. This once topped the mound next to the one on which the Plantagenet castle now stands. In 1954, when the Ministry of Works began excavations at the castle, the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology report recorded that there had been an Anglian settlement there surrounded by a wooden stockade on the site of the present bowling green and the meadow beside the castle where the annual Whitsun Fair was held. There was also evidence of an early church on the east side of the path leading to the castle entrance, probably the one later recorded in the Domesday Book. 

The green itself is very old and was played on by the then Duke of Norfolk in 1553, and was built over a burial ground just outside the original settlement. Edmund escaped the siege, fleeing northwards, and it is at this point that these few facts become submerged beneath a sea of romantic myth, with a great deal of confusion over places. The King’s standard-bearer related the details of his capture and martyrdom to Bishop Dunstan, on whose ‘trustworthy’ evidence they were incorporated into the tenth-century Passion of St Edmund. This account portrays Edmund as a deliberate martyr, surrendering to save his people further suffering. Other accounts recount how, on the contrary, the king escaped from Framlingham by cunning. One story tells of how having left the fort, Edmund encountered a party of Danes who asked him if he knew where the King was. He was in the fort before I left, Edmund replied and went on his way unmolested. Before long, however, he was caught, tortured and executed.

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The Ordinance Survey map of central & coastal Suffolk, showing the towns and villages near Framlingham and the rivers Alde and Deben, most of which are recorded as manors in the Domesday Book (1086).

Following the Norman invasion in 1066, William I gave the manor and lands around Framlingham to Ralph de Guader, an East Anglian nobleman of Breton origin, who was appointed earl of Norfolk and Suffolk. But Ralph was involved in an abortive rebellion nine years later and the lands were passed to Hugh de Avranches, his nephew, who later became a monk and died in 1101. By then, William II (1087-1100) had given the manor to his steward in East Anglia, Roger de Bigod, along with 117 manors in Suffolk and other lands in adjoining counties. Roger razed the old Saxon/ Danish fort and settlement and erected a stone castle, also rebuilding the church where St.Michael’s is now.  Roger was succeeded by his eldest son, William, who became High Steward of England. But in 1120, he was drowned in the White Ship disaster. Henry I’s only son, Prince William, set sail from Harfleur with three hundred companions, the flower of English chivalry, but the ship foundered, with all the company lost. William Bigod was succeeded by his brother Hugh, who was made Earl of Norfolk in 1135 and built a ‘strong castle’ in Framlingham. It was said of him that…

… he appears to have surpassed his fellows in acts of desertion and treachery, and to have been never more in his element than when in rebellion.

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He had plenty of scope for self-aggrandisement and coat-turning during the anarchic era 1135-54 when Henry’s nephew, Stephen, and his daughter, Matilda, were contending for the throne left vacant by his heir’s drowning. Hurrying back from Rouen, where he had been attending the dying King, Hugh convinced the Archbishop of Canterbury that Henry, on his deathbed, had nominated Stephen as his heir. He did this because he (mistakenly) viewed Stephen as a weak man whom he and the barons could manipulate. As soon as his expectations were proved unfounded, Bigod raised the standard of revolt at Norwich, where he besieged Stephen and forced him to surrender. Stephen then bought off Bigod, but by 1140 Bigod declared for Matilda and rallied his East Anglian forces to fight for her. He felt very sure of himself and his power-base, having constructed his formidable castles at Framlingham and Bungay. The accession of the new Plantagenet King, Henry II, did not divert him into the paths of loyalty. Royal and rebel armies made many appearances in the fields and heaths of Suffolk until the final showdown of 1174. By 1165 Hugh’s position was unassailable. No matter who wore the crown in London, the Bigods ruled Suffolk.

Plantagenet kings, Bigods & Mowbrays (1154-1483):

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However, Henry II (1154-1189), the first of the Plantagenet kings, was not a King who would allow anyone to defy him indefinitely, whether he was an Archbishop like Becket or an over-mighty subject like Bigod. He was also a brilliant strategist who steadily and stealthily hemmed the troublesome earl into the north-east corner of Suffolk. He secured control of Norwich, Thetford and Walton, and gave the stewardship of Eye Castle to a trusted follower. Henry’s masterstroke was the building of a royal fortress which embodied all the latest techniques of military architecture. Orford Castle, with its well-preserved keep, is the most imposing of all the medieval strongholds, guarding the sea and river approaches into Bigod territory from the thriving port on the estuary, also only a short march from Framlingham. Nevertheless, it was only a matter of time before Bigod attempted to break out of this cordon of royal control. The situation was resolved in two brief campaigns in 1173 and 1174. Hugh commanded forces with a detachment of French and Flemish mercenaries. They set off from Framlingham towards Bury St. Edmunds and Cambridge, overthrew the royal forces at Haughley, held by Ranule de Broc, and made their way west commandeering food and committing many outrages in the villages and farms along the way. Peasants and freemen fled before the foreigners’ advance and watched angrily from a safe distance as barns were looted and animals slaughtered. The indignant Suffolkers soon had their revenge, however, as a mile north of Bury St. Edmunds the rebels were surprised by a detachment of royal troops as they crossed a river near Fornham All Saints. The King’s men scattered the enemy among the low-lying meadows and marshes, where they were also confronted by angry countrymen with pitchforks and flails. Hugh Bigod agreed to a truce, but the noose around his neck grew tighter. More royal troops were stationed in Bury and Ipswich.

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When the next campaign season opened, Bigod made his last desperate bid for independence. He bought more mercenaries and tried to capture first Norwich, and then Dunwich. Henry then entered Suffolk in person and led his army straight to Framlingham. Rather than prove his proud boast of the impregnability of his fortresses, Bigod surrendered and agreed to the dismantling of his castles. Henry ordered the destruction of Framlingham, but Bigod bought the King off destroying Bungay. He then went on a crusade and died the following year. But his son, Roger was restored to favour and rebuilt the walls as we see them today, up to forty feet high in places and eight feet thick at the base, with thirteen towers. Some of these were surmounted with Elizabethan chimneys. Part of the outer moat still survives in the castle pond at the ‘entrance’ and in the stretch of water running behind the houses on the north side of Castle Street.

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But the kings of England had not yet heard their last of the Bigods. The second earl, Roger, redeemed Framingham from an impoverished Richard I (‘Lion Heart’) and rebuilt the castle on a more massive scale than its precursor. Stone for the castle and the church almost certainly came by water from Caen in Normandy, from Ketton in Rutland, and Barnack Rag from Northampton brought up the Alde and Ore. Flint and septaria, much used in the early buildings, were obtained locally. The river Ore was dammed to form a marsh which augmented the defence system on the western side. The new castle was formidable, with a three-thousand-foot circumference, walled and moated outer bailey itself moated and contained within a forty-four-foot high wall set with towers, and within that a massive keep. To the west of the inner bailey was a lower bailey or ‘base court’. Today only the inner bailey wall and the dry moats remain. In its medieval prime, the fortress must have provided a secure bastion for the lord, his family, retainers, animals and a considerable body of armed men. Adequately provisioned, the Bigods could have defied a besieging army for a long time. It was finished at about the time of King John came to the throne in 1199.

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Soon the King and the barons were in conflict again. The basic issue between them was the issue of the absolute power of the monarch and the rights of his subjects. John’s exercise of an arbitrary rule made it clear to many of the barons that finding a permanent resolution of this issue was an urgent priority. Twenty-five of them made their way to Bury St. Edmunds in November 1214, ostensibly to celebrate the feast of St. Edmund. In fact, they had come together to draft a list of liberties and laws for presentation to King John. They then…

swore on the great altar that if the king refused to grant these liberties and laws, they themselves would withdraw their allegiance to him, and make war upon him till he should, by a charter under his own seal, confirm to them everything they required.

This was the first draft of the Magna Carta, sealed reluctantly by King John at Runnymede seven months later. John mustered his forces in the Midlands while the rebel lords, who included Roger Bigod, levied troops, victualled castles and hired mercenaries. The first royal advance into East Anglia was repulsed but in March 1216 John, having subdued the rest of the country, turned his undivided attention on the eastern earls. He marched straight on Framlingham where Roger Bigod yielded without a fight on 12 March. Despite this setback, the Bigods remained the leading family of Suffolk for almost another century and were, to the last, men of independent spirit. Roger Bigod died in 1221, aged seventy and was succeeded by his son Hugh, but since he was a minor, the manor was held in the King’s pleasure. He was followed by Roger, the fourth earl. Henry III (1216-1272) visited him in 1235, 1248 and 1256. The Earl helped the King in the rebuilding of Westminster Abbey and his arms are in the North Choir Aisle. The nave of St. Michael’s Church was also built in the mid-thirteenth century, during the time of the fourth earl. He died in 1270 aged about fifty-seven. He was succeeded by Roger, the fifth Earl and last of the line, who was visited by Edward I in April 1277. This last earl was one of the leaders of fresh constitutional conflict with the crown during Edward’s reign. The last glimpse the chroniclers give us of the turbulent family is of a row between Roger and his King. Edward wanted Bigod to serve in his campaign in Gascony, but Bigod declined to put himself in harm’s way in an army which Edward himself was not going to lead:

With you, O King, I will gladly go; as belongs to me by hereditory right, I will go in front of the host before your face.”

“But without me, you will go with the rest?”

“Without you, O King, I am not bound to go, and go I will not.”

“By God, Earl, you shall either go or hang!”

“By God, King I will neither go nor hang!”

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Bigod did not go, despite Edward’s punning, and neither did he hang. But he died in 1306, all his possessions reverting to the crown, the year before Edward I himself died. Edward II then created his half-brother Prince Thomas Plantagenet Earl of Norfolk. After the death of Prince Thomas and that of his widow, the manor was assigned to Sir Robert de Ufford in the reign of Edward III (1327-1377). He died in 1369 and was succeeded by his son William who built Parham Church. The river was once navigable by small ships in the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries and there are wall etchings on the pillars either side of the entrance to the nave in Parham Church depicting such ships, probably done when the church was built. William died in 1382 and Framlingham was given to Princess Margaret Plantagenet, Thomas’ older daughter, who was created Duchess of Norfolk in 1378 in the reign of Richard II (1377-1399).

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In 1386 King Richard garrisoned the castle against an invasion by the French. The Duchess died in 1398 and the estates were given to Thomas Mowbray who was made first Duke of Norfolk. So there was a Duchess of  Norfolk before ever there was a Duke. Very shortly he was banished by the King and died in Venice in 1399. His son, Thomas, also rebelled against the King and was beheaded. The manor was given to Sir Thomas Erpingham till his death, four years later, when it passed to Henry, Prince of Wales, who held it until 1412 when the King gave it to John Mowbray, who was made second Duke of Norfolk. He died in 1432 and was succeeded by the third Duke, but he never became possessed of the estates and he died in 1461 and was succeeded by the second Duke’s grandson. This fourth Mowbray Duke added the aisles in ‘Decorated’ style to St. Michael’s Church, dating from about 1450. He had no son and his infant daughter was espoused to Richard, Duke of York, second son of King Edward IV (1461-1483) and one of the ‘Princes in the Tower’. She died aged nine and the manor again reverted to the Crown. There were, in fact, two creations of the Dukes of Norfolk, first the Mowbrays and later, their descendants the Howards.

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The Tudors & The Howard Dukes of Norfolk (1483-1635):

Richard III (1483-1485) gave the manor to John Howard whom he created 1st Duke of Norfolk. Both men were killed at the Battle of Bosworth. Henry VII (1485-1509) then gave the lands to de Vere, Earl of Oxford, but in 1489 he restored them to Thomas Howard, son of the 1st Duke, who became 2nd Howard Duke of Norfolk and had a very distinguished career, commanding the English forces at Flodden. He died in Framlingham in 1524 and his helmet, surmounted by his funeral wreath and crest, hangs above his tomb in the church (pictured below). He was succeeded by his son, also Thomas, the 3rd Duke, who was a great personal friend of Henry VIII (1509-1547), who made him Earl Marshal, Lord High Admiral and KG (Knight of the Garter). He was also uncle to two of Henry’s wives, Jane Seymour and Catherine Howard. Malicious gossips accused him of attempting to usurp the King’s rights by impaling the arms of Edward the Confessor with his own, and both he, and his son, the Earl of Surrey, were attained and thrown in the Tower. The Earl was executed but the Duke escaped the axe through the death of the King the night before the execution.

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It was this Duke who so changed the appearance of the church. His immediate ancestors had been buried at Thetford Priory, but following the dissolution of the monasteries, that place fell into disrepair and the Duke brought the family tombs to Framlingham in order to give them a suitable resting place, including his own. In order to make room for them, he had the Norman chancel built by Hugh Bigod pulled down to build a wider one now dominating the eastern aspect of the church. However, due to his attainder, the estates reverted to the King, and in the hope of avoiding their fragmentation, the Duke petitioned for them to be made over as a whole to Edward, Prince of Wales. When he became King, Edward (VI, 1547-1553) did not release the Duke, but he did order the completion of the chancel. He then gave the castle and the estates to his sister Mary, the chief reason why she came to the castle whilst awaiting news from London of her acceptance as Queen. When in July 1553, the boy king died, John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, ‘de facto’ ruler of England from 1549-1553 during Edward’s minority, tried to exclude his sister Mary from the succession by setting Lady Jane Grey on the throne. The Commons of England were almost unanimous in rejecting the Duke and his ‘protegé’, the great-granddaughter of Henry VII through his younger daughter, Mary and therefore a cousin of Edward VI. The genuine grievances of the poor and the incompetence and brutality of the government in dealing with them stirred up an intense hatred of Dudley, whose son, Lord Guildford Dudley had married Jane Grey in May of that year.

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All along her procession to Framlingham from Sawston Hall, south of Cambridge, where she had narrowly escaped Northumberland’s possé, Suffolk men and women left their kitchens, some to cheer and gaze, others to fall in behind Princess Mary’s retinue. Nor was it only the common people who flocked to her support; many of the local gentlemen came to kneel in fealty before her. She made her temporary headquarters at the Duke of Norfolk’s house at Kenninghall near Thetford. Emboldened by her growing support, Mary proclaimed herself Queen and summoned the rest of the Suffolk gentry to come to her aid at Framlingham with men and arms. By the time she set out for the town on 14 July, the entire shire had committed itself. A sizeable army encamped around the castle under the leadership of the Sheriff, Sir Thomas Cornwallis. Two days later, Northumberland’s men, who had reached Cambridge, heard reports of the thirty thousand men under Mary’s command. Their refusal to proceed against the Suffolk host sealed the fate of the Duke and Lady Jane Grey, the  Nine Days’ Queen.

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The newly-proclaimed Queen selected a council from among her gentry supporters, emptied the prisons to swell her army and secured the support of the main towns and ports of East Anglia. But all opposition collapsed in any event. When Mary Tudor made her way through Suffolk and Essex a few days later it was at the head of a triumphant procession, not a cautious army. Towns and villages turned out to greet the rightful heir to the throne, whom they believed would heed their petitions and deliver them from the anarchic government of self-seeking lords. The honeymoon was short-lived; disappointment and disillusionment soon set in, nowhere more so than in loyal Suffolk, where one of the earliest burnings of protestants took place on 9 February 1555, on Aldham Common in Hadleigh. Dr Rowland Taylor, the local incumbent, was the first of eighteen men and women in the county to be martyred before Mary died in 1558. She restored the manor of Framlingham to the old duke whom she released from the Tower, but he died in 1554 and is buried St. Michael’s in Framlingham, where his tomb is positioned between his two wives in the rebuilt chancel, along with the tombs of the beheaded Earl of Surrey and Henry Fitzroy, bastard son of Henry VIII who married Surrey’s sister.

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During the reign of Elizabeth I (1558-1603), the Earl of Surrey’s son succeeded as 4th Duke, but he intrigued against the Queen and was imprisoned in the Tower, where he died in 1572. It is said that he had hoped to marry Mary Queen of Scots. From 1580, Elizabeth used the castle as a prison for recusant priests. The family tree of the Howards then became complicated by the fact that the 4th Duke had married three times. James I (1603-1625) restored Framlingham to Thomas, the eldest son the 4th Duke’s second marriage, and made him Lord Howard of Walden and 1st Earl of Suffolk. His son, also Thomas, was made a joint heir to Framlingham with his nephew, Theophilus, who eventually succeeded to the whole estate, becoming 2nd Earl of Suffolk and holding his first manorial court in 1627. On 14 May 1635, Theophilus sold the estate to Sir Robert Hitcham, who settled it on Pembroke College, Cambridge for pious uses on the Master, Fellows and Scholars, who have held it ever since.

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Stuart and Commonwealth Times (1616-1708):

Sir Robert was a prominent lawyer and at one time was Attorney-General to Anne of Denmark, Queen Consort of James I. In 1616 he was made King’s Senior Serjeant-at-Law and was knighted. He died in 1636. Although he was such a prominent lawyer he did not make a very good hand of his Will in which he left instructions that on his death the interior of the castle was to be dismantled and the materials used for the building of almshouses and a school for poor children; but to the poor of Framlingham he added those of Debenham, six miles away, and Coggeshall in Essex. This infuriated the people of Framlingham who saw no reason why they should pay for these others and they took the trustees to law. In the end, the matter was resolved by an Ordinance issued under the Seal of the Commonwealth allocating money from the trust to each of the places concerned.

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In the meantime the country was going through troublesome times, being divided into the two factions of the Civil War, the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. The latter were very strong in Suffolk and the religious conflict is exemplified in the story of Richard Golty, Rector of Framlingham with Saxtead. He had been given the living in 1621 but at first, had to be content to act as Curate-in-Charge as there was already a Rector in the Reverend Thomas Dove who, though Bishop of Peterborough, was also Rector of Framlingham, though he never visited the parish. The Bishop died in 1630 and Golty entered fully into his own, but when Charles I was executed, he refused to take the Oath of Allegiance to the Commonwealth and was ejected from the living and retired to Ashbocking where he had a small estate. On the return of the Monarchy in 1660 he returned to Framlingham. His fame rests largely on a wonderful account book which he kept and entered all the details of tithes and other transactions in which he was involved. Another resident of Framlingham, who was also churchwarden, was Nicholas Danforth. A widower at the age of fifty, and being of a more puritan persuasion, he decided, like many other East Anglian dissenters, to emigrate in 1634 to the New World, taking with him his six children. He settled first in Boston, where he at once became a man of importance, being first a ‘townsman’ and then a ‘selectman’. His son Thomas was virtually the founder of Framlingham in Massachusetts. He crossed the ocean in the ship Griffin but alas left no record of the perils and hardships his family faced. He was accompanied on the voyage by the Reverend John Lothrop, together with William and Anne Hutchinson with their families.

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Not long after Danforth set out for the New World, in 1640, a young man from nearby Grundisburgh, Thomas Mills arrived in Framlingham. He sought work from Edward Smith, a wheelwright, and was taken on and so well did he endear himself to his employer that the latter, on his death, being childless, left the whole business. He married a rich widow, Alice Groom from Ufford, and built up a fine property not only in Framlingham but in several of the surrounding villages. A strong dissenter, he did much to protect a small colony of Baptists who used to meet in Link Horn’s Barn on Brook Lane. Sadly, he lost his only child whilst still an infant, and no doubt influenced by seeing the Hitcham Almshouses in the course of erection, he too decided to build some of these, giving detailed instructions in his Will. He died in 1703 when the houses, originally six in number, were built by his faithful steward, William Mayhew, who added two more under the supervision of the Trustees of the Will. Mills himself is buried in his own garden which has given the name ‘Tomb House’ to the house in Station Road that stands back slightly from the street. Inside the small building is the tomb itself, covered with a fine slab of black marble. The nearby almshouses (pictured below) are still in use, thoroughly modernised and now privately owned.

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A feature of the church is the organ and the gallery on which it stands. The organ case belonged to Pembroke College and though the interior was destroyed by Cromwell’s Commissioners, the case escaped and after the Restoration it was used again to house a new organ made by Thamar of Peterborough in 1674. It is one of only eight pre-Civil War cases remaining in England. It is believed to date back before 1630, perhaps to 1580 and some of the pipework may at least pre-date the Commonwealth. The only other painted pipes of this style are to be found in Gloucester Cathedral. In 1707, the College decided it would like a larger organ for their Wren Chapel, so the Thamar organ came to St. Michael’s with its old case in 1708, as a gift from the College.

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Victorian Times & The Twentieth Century:

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‘Fast-forwarding’ to Victorian times (1837-1901), the other significant events, not  referred to elsewhere in this text, are listed as follows:

1850: Gas-lighting introduced into the town (this was heralded as a great improvement over the old oil lamps that had been erected in 1828).

1898: Rev J Pilkington succeeds Rev E Bickersteth and continues the scheme for the alterations in St. Michael’s Church when the organ was moved from the west end to the north aisle and then to the Chancel.

1900:  First sewer and sewage works provided.

Above: Various Victorian items, posters and pictures in the Castle & Town Museum.

And in the rest of the Twentieth Century:

1906: First Manual telephone exchange opened in Bridge Street, with twenty-two subscribers, limited to the hours of 7.00 a.m. to 9.30 p.m.

1920: Electric street-lighting introduced in the town.

1948: Fire-station opened; prior to this, the fire-engine was housed in various premises in the town.

1970: Thamar Organ (below) replaced on the rebuilt gallery at the west end of St. Michael’s Church, with the aid of the Pilgrim Trust.

1982: Another organ by William Allen of Soho Square (1797) brought to the church, given in memory of Joseph Tanner, 1853-1934 … scholar of Pembroke College, Cambridge and of his daughter, Margaret Josephine Millard, 1907-1980.

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The Town Heritage Trail:

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Above: Framlingham Town Centre today. Below: As it was in 1970, drawn by O.R. Sitwell.

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The oldest house in Framlingham is almost certainly the ‘Guildhall’ on Market Hill (above). It is now divided into business premises, but a good idea of how it looked 250 years ago can be gained from a small drawing in the Castle Museum. The house is described in Green’s (1835) History of Framlingham as having stood on the site of a still older building that existed in 1363, but the Guild as such probably suffered dissolution along with other religious houses under Henry VIII. Inside, there is a very fine old panelled room. Both this house and the one to the east of it, nos. 33 and 33a, are remarkable because although they look as if they were built in brick, they are, in fact, Suffolk timber-framed, with specially-made brick tiles cleverly hung on the front. At the corner of Market Hill and Church Street is another old house, now the Chemists (below).

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This also runs up Church Street and appears to join on to the one which used to be a gunsmith’s shop, but originally the two were separated by a stable with a hayloft over. The gunshop, ‘Normans’, was taken out of the very fine house overlooking the churchyard (below), though now partially restored to it. It is thought that judging by its position and style, it may originally have been erected for himself by the Master Builder engaged by the 3rd Howard Duke of Norfolk to pull down and enlarge the chancel of St. Michael’s, sometime between 1545 and 1550.

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The former Rectory stands at the West end of the church. It is not known exactly when it was built, but it could have been adapted from a farmhouse and certainly was greatly altered and added to by the Reverend George Attwood who was rector from May 1837 till his death in 1884. It was converted to flats in 1963. The present Rectory stands at a lower level in part of the former garden.

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Returning to Market Hill, we pass a row of old houses, now shops, which stretch from Crown and Anchor Lane to the Crown Hotel, an old posting-house. Originally there was a through-way for coaches right through the building. Those coming from Ipswich entered from Fairfield Road, opposite at the back, and emerging onto the Market Place on their way to Norwich. This coach-way was blocked up when the hotel was reconstructed by Trust Houses in 1951. At the same time, the old Corn Exchange, which was built in 1848, was incorporated into the hotel. Tucked away in the extreme South-west corner of Market Hill between what was the butcher’s shop (now a delicatessen) and what was the Queen’s Head Inn is the Queen’s Head Passage, apparently allowed for in the building of the Inn since part of the underside of a staircase can be seen overhead. The passage gives access to the houses behind and to a former small brewery on Lower Fore Street.

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The houses along the west side of Market Hill (above) are of several periods, the oldest being used as teashops, estate agents and charity shops. Opposite them and just up the lane that leads to the west end of the church via its steps there once stood a fine Queen Anne house known as ‘Step House’ which was pulled down in 1833 following the bankruptcy of its owner. The gardens extended down to the old meeting-house and covered the site of the present Court-house, which was built in 1872. Petty Sessions have been held in Framlingham since 1826, but prior to the erection of the Court-house, they were held at the castle or in an upper room in the Crown Hotel. The Old Meeting-house is used by the congregation of Unitarians. It was originally built in 1717 by a congregation of Presbyterians and Baptists, who later became Unitarians. Next to it stands the Manse with the date 1681 on the door.

Next to the river bridge is an old house with a high-pitched roof, formerly thatched, and the small dormer windows are indicative of its period. In the 1960s, this was divided into two shops (see the Sitwell sketch below). Similar old houses are to be seen in Fore Street, Double Street, Castle Street and elsewhere in the town.

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Crossing the bridge and turning left down Riverside we come to the Post Office, the business part of which has been added to what was a farmhouse. At the apex of the triangle between Riverside and Albert Place is the Methodist/ United Reform Church. The Wesleyans first arrived in the town in 1794 and their first chapel stood where the Railway Inn now stands in Station Road. There was a conflict over the mortgage on the property and the building was sold and then pulled down in 1868. In the meantime, a steam flour mill was erected on the site of a former coach-house, but it failed. The machinery was removed and the building converted into ‘the People’s Hall’. In 1885 the Methodists purchased it and it has served them ever since, latterly in the company of URC members.

Beside the river near the corner of Fore Street with Riverside stands one of the old town pumps. This one is unusual in having two spouts, the lower one was used by the townspeople when drawing water but in the days when a water-cart was used to lay the dust in the streets, the driver used to block up the lower spout and by means of a short hose fill his cart from the upper one. Across the junction with Lower Fore Street, on the corner of Station Road, is the ‘Ancient House’, a typical Suffolk frame house with interesting pargetting on the front. A section of this has been removed to reveal the original timber beams. The windows are of a type that dates the house as prior to 1670-80 when the cruciform type with leaded panes gave way to the prevalent sash window which became a feature of late Jacobean to Queen Anne houses, like the one on the other side of the Belisha crossing on Albert Place. The earlier style of window in the ‘Ancient House’ opens on an iron frame hung on two hooks. The small square opening frames are more modern.

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Above: A sketch of the ‘Queen Anne’ House on Albert Place by Grace Sitwell, c. 1970

Turning back up Fore Street, we pass the end of the path from the Queen’s Head Passage (above). Across the road from this is the small wooden hut converted by the Roman Catholics into a church, and a little further up on the left is the Congregational Chapel, dating from 1823, now converted into private residences. The Congregationalists were originally established in Hermitage Place in 1819. Higher up one passes the back entrance to the Crown Hotel with the old blacksmith’s forge opposite.

Returning to the junction of Fore Street with Riverside and turning right along Albert Place, then proceeding via Wells Close Square (now a traffic roundabout) to Lower Bridge Street, we come to a small group of seventeenth-century houses on the right-hand side of the road. One of these, now a charity shop, formerly a granary, has a stone-built well underlying the steps to its lower floor.

Directly opposite, where there is now a development of sheltered housing behind the bus-stop, there was once a cattle market which was in weekly use on Market Day until 1937, since when the present house, bakery and shop (now a café on the corner of New Road) were built. Wells Close Square was named after Henry Wells whose all-embracing shop became the home of the Framlingham Engineering Company, now the premises of Clarke & Simpson Estate Agents on the left. Crossing Bridge Street into New Road, we come to the Hitcham Almshouses which were built in 1654, with the second of Hitcham’s poor schools at the far end, now the Masonic Hall (as can be seen from the symbols on its circular window above the door). Returning to the right of the roundabout leading up College Road, the former White Horse Inn is on the other side of the road, which at the time of writing is undergoing transformation into a close of apartments and houses. The Inn is an early seventeenth-century building, and beyond it are a series of old houses in front of the old gas works, one of the first in the country to change to modern Butane gas.

Next on the right in College Road comes the Primary School, now enlarged and improved from the days when the Charity Commissioners built it after the amalgamation of the Hitcham and Mills Trusts; and keeping to the right at the junction where the B1119 leaves the B1116 and where there is one of the two Victorian pillar boxes in the town, we approach the College with splendid views of the castle across the Mere. Passing the College and the Athlone Hall, we turn left along Pembroke Road, and left again after the Doctor’s surgery. Crossing Saxtead Road below the High School, we come to the lane known as New Street, not to be confused with New Road in the town, a here stands the farm which was once the home of Nicholas Danforth, founder of Framlingham in Massachusetts.

At the bottom of the hill, Brook Lane goes off to the left, whilst on the right is the bridle path that was once the main road to Earl Soham. Following Brook Lane, we pass the Link Horn barn once used by the Baptists in Thomas Mills’ day, and then comes a turn which, if taken, brings us back into College Road via Vyces Road. Keeping straight on, we come to Station Road between the Mills Almshouses on the left and the wing of Tomb House on the right. Beside the road is a small red-brick building once the home of William Mayhew, and later the first Mills school and after that the town reading-room.

Turning right along Station Road we come to the front of Tomb House with the tomb itself in the garden close to the railings. In it lie Thomas Mills and his faithful servant William Mayhew, as set out on the tablet. At first, the tomb stood in the open, but later the trustees built the little house over it in which they then held their meetings. A little further down Station Road, past ‘The Wine Shop’, are the remains of what was the station itself when the railway line reached Framlingham in 1859. Since it was closed to all traffic in 1965, the line has been taken up and all crossings have been removed. Situated next to the station, the Station Hotel is well worth a sojourn, if only to sample the ales provided by the Earl Soham Brewery.

The road leading up the hill to the right is Victoria Mill Road, joining New Street at Red House Farm. Just past the station yard, is a terrace of fine mid-Victorian ‘villas’, no doubt built soon after the coming of the railway. In the opposite direction, leading across the old, publicly-owned ‘Fair Field’ is a footpath to the new Fairfield Road, with its first modern housing, built before 1970, both for Council and Private housing. On the left are two very pleasant houses, Fairfield Hall and Fairfield House, and along with an old ‘forge’ cottage, before we emerge again onto Fore Street at the end of the old coaching road opposite the Crown Hotel.

The lane opposite to Fairfield Road is Crown and Anchor Lane, once called White Hart Lane. All the buildings on the right of the lane were once part of a large brewery owned by John Brook Keer, whose bankruptcy has already been mentioned. In all, twenty-one inns in Framlingham and the neighbourhood were sold, along with a lot of other town property, including the former Mansion House and the Manor House. The purchaser of the ‘White Hart’ as it was then called, changed its name to the ‘Crown and Anchor’ and dispossessed the landlady. These two actions so annoyed her son, a builder, that he bought the piece of land nearest to the Inn on which he built another public house, which he then named the ‘White Hart’. Apparently, this can be identified by its having cut deeply into a row of bricks about ten feet from the ground the initials of the men who helped him build it.

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Continuing up Fore Street we pass another former pub, the old ‘Waggon and Horses’, which became a butcher’s and is now a private house. On the right-hand side of the street is the entrance to the cemetery, opened in 1856 when the churchyard was closed for burials. Re-crossing the road we come to the Police Station, ‘Glenview’, which was connected directly to Woodbridge via the telephone exchange next to the cemetery in 1926. The service was maintained single-handed until 1937 when daytime help was provided and became automatic in 1961.

Fore Street curves to the left and brings us between an old farmhouse and ‘The Haynings’, to an open space in the road junction with the Badingham and Saxmundham Roads where there is an open brick shelter covering a former town well. The shelter was erected in memory of John Cordy Jeafferson, a historian and novelist.

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Turning down Castle Street, the house next to the former corn-drying plant is known as ‘Moat House’ because part of the castle moat lies in the garden. It is probably as old as the house next to it called ‘The Readery’, so-called because it was restored and converted for use by the ‘Readers’, whose duty under the Will of Sir Robert Hitcham was to read from the scriptures twice every day to the inhabitants of the alms-houses who were assembled in the church for this purpose. A little further on is an old low house with dormer windows and a bow-front window which was once ‘licensed to sell tea and tobacco’, as etched into the fascia on the window. We are now opposite the end of Double Street where one of the two remaining Victorian pillar boxes stands.

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Double Street used to be called Bow Street, no doubt according to its shape; Castle Street and Church Street forming the plucked string and Bow Street the bent bow. It was said to have changed its name to Double Street when it became the first street in the town to have dwellings on both sides. Originally, Castle Street may have been restricted from having properties backing onto the castle for defensive reasons, as referred to above. Double Street was once the principal shopping street in the town as can still be seen from the remaining shop fronts, although all but one (an antique shop) are purely private houses now.

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The oldest houses (above top), numbers 19 and 21, are on the right-hand side as we go down the street. A little further around the curve, we come to no. 9, which is where Richard Lambert, the printer, had his offices. He recorded all he saw and heard in the Framlingham Weekly News and his Almanacks, copies of which, from 1860 to 1917, are in the museum.

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He also worked just around the corner in ‘Church House’, now ‘Regency House’, in Church Street. This house is misleading to the eye as the front, with its distinctive balcony, does not belong to the original house, but was brought from London and incorporated into the original timber frame. Also, the whitewashed walls are actually made of wooden panels, shaped to look like stone blocks, as can be seen in close-up below. Appropriately, crossing Church Street at this point, we return to St. Michael’s Church precincts.

Sources:

O.R. Sitwell (1970), A Guide to Framlingham. Framlingham & District Local History & Preservation Society.

Derek Wilson (1977), A Short History of Suffolk. London: Batsford.

http://www.stmichaelsframlingham.org.uk

http://www.wikipaedia.com

All photographs by Andrew J Chandler, 2018-19, except the external pictures of the castle, taken from English Heritage publicity.

 

Posted September 20, 2019 by TeamBritanniaHu in Agriculture, Anglican Reformation, Anglicanism, Anglo-Saxons, baptism, Baptists, Britain, British history, Britons, Castles, Christian Faith, Christianity, Church, Commemoration, Commonwealth, Conquest, Dark Ages, democracy, Demography, Domesticity, Early Modern English, East Anglia, Economics, Education, English Language, Framlingham, Henry V, Henry VIII, History, Integration, liberal democracy, Literature, manufacturing, Marriage, Medieval, Memorial, Mercia, Methodism, Middle English, Midlands, Migration, Monuments, Mythology, Narrative, Norfolk, Normans, Plantagenets, Population, Poverty, Remembrance, Stuart times, Suffolk, terror, theology, Tudor England, Tudor times, tyranny, United Kingdom, Warfare, Wars of the Roses

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Beginnings of the Cold War in Central/Eastern Europe, 1946-56: Territory, Tyranny and Terror.   1 comment

019Eastern Europe in 1949. Source: András Bereznay (2002), The Times History of Europe.

Following the defeat of the Third Reich, the map of the European continent was radically transformed. The most striking transformation was the shrinking of Germany, with Poland the principal beneficiary, and the division of what remained of the two countries. But Poland lost vast territories on its eastern border to the Soviet Union. West Germany (from 1949, ‘the Federal Republic’) was formed from the American, French and British areas of occupied Germany; East Germany (‘the Democratic Republic’ from 1949) was formed from the Soviet-occupied zone (see the maps below). The former German capital followed this pattern in miniature. Czechoslovakia was revived, largely along the lines it had been in 1919, and Hungary was restored to the borders established by the Treaty of Trianon in 1920. Yugoslavia was also restored in the form it had been before the war. The Baltic states – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania – together with the Ukraine and Bessarabia, were all incorporated into the Soviet Union. Austria was detached from Germany and restored to independence, initially under a Soviet-sponsored government reluctantly recognised by the western powers. It gradually moved away from Soviet influence over the following ten years.

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It rapidly became clear that Stalin’s intentions were wholly at variance with the West’s goals for western Germany. The two zones of Germany followed wholly divergent paths: while denazification in the west followed the Austrian model, with the first free elections taking place in January 1946. However, in the east the Soviets moved quickly to eradicate all pre-war political parties other than the communists, sponsoring the German Communist Party, which became the Socialist Unity Party in April 1946. All other political organisations were suppressed by November 1947. As it became clear that the western and eastern halves of the country were destined for separate futures, so relations between the former Allies deteriorated. Simultaneously, the Soviet Army stripped the country of industrial plunder for war reparations. Germany rapidly became one of the major theatres of the Great Power Conflict of the next forty years. Berlin became the focal point within this conflict from the winter of 1948/49, as Stalin strove to force the Western Allies out of the city altogether. In September 1949, the Western Allies, abandoning for good any hopes they had of reaching a rapprochement with Stalin, announced the creation of the Federal Republic of Germany. This was followed, the next month, by the creation of the Soviet-sponsored GDR. More broadly, it was clear by the end of 1949, that Stalin had created what was in effect a massive extension of the Soviet Empire, as well as a substantial buffer zone between the USSR proper and the West. Western-Soviet relations were plunged into a deep freeze from which they would not emerge for decades: the Cold War. In escaping Nazi occupation, much of Central/Eastern Europe had simply exchanged one form of tyranny for another.  

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In July 1947, the USA had issued invitations to twenty-two European countries to attend a conference in Paris, scheduled for 12th July, to frame Europe’s response to the Marshall Plan, the proposal put forward by President Truman’s Secretary of State to provide an economic lifeline to the countries of Europe struggling to recover from the devastation caused by the World War. Stalin and his Foreign Minister, Molotov, had already given their reaction. Stalin saw the issue not only in economic but also political terms, his suspicious nature detecting an American plot. He thought that once the Americans got their fingers into the Soviet economy, they would never take them out. Moreover, going cap-in-hand to capitalists was, in his view, the ultimate sign of failure for the Communist system. The socialist countries would have to work out their own economic salvation. Nevertheless, Molotov succeeded in persuading Stalin to allow him to go to Paris to assess the American offer.

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The ‘big four’ – Britain, France, the USA and the USSR – met first at the end of June in Paris. Molotov agreed to back limited American involvement in the economies of Europe with no strings attached. However, Soviet intelligence soon revealed that both Britain and France saw Marshall’s offer as a plan for aiding in the full-scale reconstruction of Europe. Not only that, but Molotov was informed that the American under-secretary, Will Clayton, was having bilateral talks with British ministers in which they had already agreed that the Plan would not be an extension of the wartime Lend-Lease Agreement which had almost bankrupted Britain in the immediate post-war years. The British and the Americans also saw the reconstruction of Germany as the key factor in reviving the continent’s economy. This was anathema to the Soviets, who were keen to keep Germany weak and to extract reparations from it. The Soviet Union was always anxious about what it saw as attempts by the Western allies to downplay its status as the chief victor in the war. Molotov cabled Stalin that all hope of effecting Soviet restrictions on Marshall aid now seemed dead. On 3rd July, Molotov, accusing the Western powers of seeking to divide Europe into two hostile camps, gathered up his papers and returned to Moscow that same evening.

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With the Soviets out-of-the-way, invitations went out to all the states of Western Europe except Spain. They also went to Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Albania, Finland, Yugoslavia, Poland and Czechoslovakia. After initial hesitation, Moscow instructed its ‘satellites’ to reject the invitation. On 7th July, messages informed party bosses in the Eastern European capitals that…

…under the guise of drafting plans for the revival of Europe, the sponsors of the conference in fact are planning to set up a Western bloc which includes West Germany. In view of those facts … we suggest refusing to participate in the conference.

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Most of the Communist parties in the Central-Eastern European countries did just as they were told, eager to display their loyalty to Stalin. But the Polish and Czech governments found the offer of US dollars too appealing since this was exactly what their economies needed. In Czechoslovakia, about a third of the ministers in the coalition government were Communists, reflecting the share of the vote won by the party in the 1946 elections. Discussions within the government about the Marshall aid offer, however, produced a unanimous decision to attend the Paris conference. Stalin was furious and summoned Gottwald, the Communist Prime Minister, to Moscow immediately. Jan Masaryk, the foreign minister, an independent non-Communist member of the Prague Government. Stalin kept them waiting until the early hours and then angrily told them to cancel their decision to go to Paris. He said that the decision was a betrayal of the Soviet Union and would also undermine the efforts of the Communist parties in Western Europe to discredit the Marshall Plan as part of a Western plot to isolate the Soviet Union. He brushed aside their protests, and they returned to Prague, where the Czechoslovak Government, after an all-day meeting, unanimously cancelled its original decision. Masaryk, distraught, told his friends:

I went to Moscow as the foreign minister of an independent sovereign state; I returned as a Soviet slave.

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Above: Conflicting cartoon images of the Marshall Plan and the Cold War. Fitzpatrick, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, shows the Kremlin’s noose tightening around Czechoslovakia. Krokodil has the Europeans on their knees before their US paymaster. 

The Poles forced them into line as well, and their government made a similar announcement. Stalin had his way; the Eastern Bloc now voted as one and from now on each state took its orders from the Kremlin. Europe was divided and the Cold War was irreparably underway. From Washington’s perspective, the Marshall Plan was designed to shore up the European economies, ensure the future stability of the continent by avoiding economic catastrophe, thereby preventing the spread of communism, which was already thriving amidst the economic chaos of Western Europe. But from the Kremlin’s point of view, the plan appeared to be an act of economic aggression. Stalin had felt his own power threatened by the lure of the almighty ‘greenback’. In Washington, Stalin’s opposition to the plan was seen as an aggressive act in itself. The US ambassador in Moscow described it as nothing less than a declaration of war by the Soviet Union. Both sides were now locked in mutual suspicion and distrust and the effects of the Marshall Plan was to make the Iron Curtain a more permanent feature of postwar Europe.

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The same day as the Conference on European Economic Cooperation (CEEC) opened in Paris, 12th July 1947, the first meeting of Cominform, the short form of the Communist Information Bureau took place in the village of Szkliarska Poremba in Poland. A revival of the old Communist alliance, or Comintern, established by Lenin, this was a direct response to the Marshall Plan, and an attempt to consolidate Stalin’s control over the Soviet satellites and to bring unanimity in Eastern Bloc strategy. Andrei Zhdanov, the Soviet ideologue, Stalin’s representative at the meeting, denounced the Truman Doctrine as aggressive and, playing on Eastern European fears of resurgent Nazism, accused the Marshall Plan of trying to revive German industry under the control of American financiers. Along with the representatives of the Communist parties of France and Italy, which had been encouraged to operate through left-wing coalitions in a Popular Front, the Czechoslovak Communist delegates were ordered to move away from their coalition and to seize the initiative.

The coalition government in Czechoslovakia had previously operated on the principle that Czechoslovak interests were best served by looking both to the West and to the East, an idea dear to the hearts of both President Benes and Foreign Minister Masaryk. But as relations between the two power blocs worsened, the position of Czechoslovakia, straddling East and West, became ever more untenable. Masaryk, though not a Communist, felt increasingly cut off by the West after Prague’s failure to participate in the Marshall Plan. Washington regarded the capitulation to Stalin over the Paris conference as signifying that Czechoslovakia was now part of the Soviet bloc. The harvest of 1947 was especially bad in Czechoslovakia, with the yield of grain just two-thirds of that expected and the potato crop only half. The need for outside help was desperate, and Masaryk appealed to Washington, but the US made it clear that there would be no aid and no loans until Prague’s political stance changed. Although Masaryk tried to convince the US government that the Soviet line had been forced on them, he failed to change the American position. Then the Soviets promised Czechoslovakia 600,000 tons of grain, which helped prevent starvation and won wide support for Stalin among the Czechoslovak people. Foreign trade Minister Hubert Ripka said…

Those idiots in Washington have driven us straight into the Stalinist camp.

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When the Soviet deputy foreign minister arrived in Prague, supposedly to oversee the delivery of the promised grain, the non-Communist ministers took a gamble. On 20th February, they resigned from office, hoping to force an early election. But President Benes, who was seriously ill, wavered. Following orders from the Cominform, the Communists took to the streets, organising giant rallies and whipping up popular support. They used the police to arrest and intimidate opponents and formed workers’ assemblies at factories. On 25th February, fearing civil war, Benes allowed Gottwald to form a new Communist-led government. In the picture on the left above, Klement Gottwald is seen calling for the formation of a new Communist government, while President Benes stands to his left. In the picture on the right, units of armed factory workers march to a mass gathering in support of the takeover in the capital.

In five days, the Communists had taken power in Prague and Czechoslovakia was sentenced to membership of the Soviet camp for more than forty years. Masaryk remained as foreign minister but was now a broken man, his attempt to bridge East and West having failed. A fortnight later, he mysteriously fell to his death from the window of his apartment in the Foreign Ministry. Thousands of mourners lined the streets for his funeral, which marked the end of the free Republic of Czechoslovakia which had been founded by his father, Tomás Masaryk thirty years earlier. News of the Communist takeover in Prague sent shock waves through Washington, where the Marshall Plan was still making its way through Congress. Now the case had been made by events: without US intervention, Europe would fall to the Communists, both East and West. Had Washington not written off Czechoslovakia as an Eastern bloc state, refusing to help the non-Communists, the outcome of those events might have been different. This was a harsh but salient lesson for the US administration, but it made matters worse by talk of possible immediate conflict. The Navy secretary began steps to prepare the American people for war and the Joint Chiefs of Staff drew up an emergency war plan to meet a Soviet invasion of Western Europe. On 17th March, Truman addressed a joint session of Congress with a fighting speech:

The Soviet Union and its agents have destroyed the independence and democratic character of a whole series of nations in Eastern and Central Europe. … It is this ruthless course of action, and the clear design to extend it to the remaining free nations of Europe, that have brought about the critical situation in Europe today. The tragic death of the Republic of Czechoslovakia has sent a shock wave through the civilized world. … There are times in world history when it is far wiser to act than to hesitate. There is some risk involved in action – there always is. But there is far more risk involved in failure to act.

Truman asked for the approval of the Marshall Plan and for the enactment of universal military training and selective service. On 3rd April, Congress approved $5.3 billion in Marshall aid. Two weeks later, the sixteen European nations who had met in Paris the previous year, signed the agreement which established the OEEC, the body which the US Administration to formalise requests for aid, recommend each country’s share, and help in its distribution. Within weeks the first shipments of food aid were arriving in Europe. Next came fertilisers and tractors, to increase agricultural productivity. Then came machines for industry. The tap of Marshall aid had been turned on, but too late as far as Poland and Czechoslovakia were concerned. The plan was political as well as economic. It grew out of the desire to prevent the spread of communism into Western Europe. No longer could European nations sit on the fence. Each country had to choose whether it belonged to the Western or the Soviet bloc. In the immediate post-war years the situation had been fluid, but the Marshall Plan helped to accelerate the division of Europe. Forced to reject Marshall aid, Czechoslovakia became part of the Soviet sphere of influence, albeit abandoned to this fate by Washington, sacrificed once more by the Western powers. On the other hand, France and Italy were now firmly in the Western camp.

Paranoia permeated the Soviet system and Communist Central/GeorgeEastern Europe in the late forties and early fifties, just as it had done during Stalin’s reign of terror in the thirties. Hundreds of thousands of people were sent to labour camps and many thousands, loyal party members, were executed. In Hungary, as many as one in three families had a member in jail during the Stalinist period. As one Hungarian once told me, recalling his childhood forty years earlier, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, written in 1948 but only recently (in 1988) available to Hungarians to read, was 1948 in Hungary. In the Soviet Union and throughout the Soviet bloc, conformity was everything and no dissent was allowed. Independent thought was fiercely tracked down, rooted out, and repressed.

In the first phase of the Soviet takeover of Central/ Eastern Europe, Communist parties, with the backing of the Kremlin, had taken control of the central apparatus of each state.  Sometimes there were tensions between the local Communists, who had been part of the underground resistance to the Nazis, and those who had been exiled in Moscow and who had been appointed at the behest of Stalin to senior positions in the local parties. Initially, they were devoted to condemning their political opponents as class enemies. In 1948 a new phase began in the Sovietisation of the ‘satellite’ states, in which each nation was to be politically controlled by its Communist Party, and each local party was to be subject to absolute control from Moscow.

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In Hungary, the arrests had begun at Advent in 1946, with the seizure of lawyer and politician, György Donáth by the ÁVO, the state security police, on a charge of conspiracy against the Republic. Prior to his arrest, Donáth had left Budapest for a pre-Christmas vacation near the Hungarian border, so the ÁVO, who had had him under surveillance for some time, feared that he might attempt to flee the country and wasted no time in arresting him there, using the secret military police, KATPOL. Following this, a number of his associates were also arrested. In order to save these fellow leaders of the secret Hungarian Fraternal Community (MTK), which he had reactivated in the spring of 1946, he took all responsibility upon himself. He was condemned to death by a People’s Tribunal on 1st April 1947, and executed on 23rd October the same year. Cardinal Mindszenty, the representative of the religious majority in the country, was arrested soon after and put on trial on 3rd February 1949.

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(Following his release from prison a week before, in 1956)

In Czechoslovakia, where the Party had seized control in February 1948, a series of ‘show trials’ highlighted different stages in the imposition of Communist authority. Between 1948 and 1952 death sentences were passed against 233 political prisoners – intellectuals, independent thinkers, socialists, Christians. The execution of Zavis Kalandra, an associate of the Surrealists and a Marxist who had split with the prewar Communist Party, shocked Prague. Nearly 150,000 people were made political prisoners in Czechoslovakia, seven thousand Socialist Party members among them.

The crisis that prompted this strengthening of control was the split with Tito in 1948. The war-time partisan leader of Yugoslavia headed the only Communist country in Eastern Europe where power was not imposed by Moscow but came through his own popularity and strength. Although Stalin’s favourite for a while, Tito was soon out of favour with him for resisting the Soviet control of both Yugoslavia’s economy and its Communist Party.  In June 1948, Yugoslavia was expelled from Cominform for having placed itself outside the family of the fraternal Communist parties. Stalin even prepared plans for a military intervention, but later decided against it. The ‘mutiny’ in Yugoslavia now gave Stalin the opportunity he sought to reinforce his power. He could now point not just to an external ‘imperialist’ enemy, but to an ‘enemy within’. ‘Titoism’ became the Kremlin’s excuse for establishing a tighter grip on the Communist parties of Eastern Europe. Between 1948 and 1953 all the parties were forced through a crash programme of Stalinisation – five-year plans, forced collectivisation, the development of heavy industry, together with tighter Party control over the army and the bureaucratisation of the Party itself. To maintain discipline the satellites were made to employ a vast technology of repression.

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‘Show trials’ were used were used to reinforce terror; “justice” became an instrument of state tyranny in order to procure both public obedience and the total subservience of the local party to Soviet control. The accused were forced, by torture and deprivation, to ‘confess’ to crimes against the state. Communist Party members who showed any sign of independence or ‘Titoism’ were ruthlessly purged. The most significant of these trials was that of László Rajk in Hungary. Rajk had fought in the Spanish Civil War and had spent three years in France before joining the resistance in Hungary. After the war, he became the most popular member of the Communist leadership. Although he had led the Communist liquidation of the Catholic Church, he was now himself about to become a victim of Stalinist repression. He was Rákosi’s great opponent and so had to be eliminated by him. Under the supervision of Soviet adviser General Fyodor Byelkin, confessions were concocted to do with a Western imperialist and pro-Tito plot within the Hungarian Communist Party. Rajk was put under immense pressure, including torture, being told he must sacrifice himself for the sake of the Party. János Kádár, an old party friend and godfather to Rajk’s son, told him that he must confess to being a Titoist spy and that he and his family would be able to start a new life in Russia. Rajk agreed, but on 24th September 1949, he and two other defendants were sentenced to death and executed a month later. In the picture below, Rajk is pictured on the left, appearing at his trial.

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The Rajk confession and trial became a model for show trials across Eastern Europe. But in Hungary itself, the trial and execution of Rajk, Szebeny and General Pálffy-Oesterreicher were to ‘fatally’ undermine the Rákosi régime. Rákosi and Gerő were typical of the Communists who had lived in exile in Moscow during the war. Compared with Rajk, and the later Premier Imre Nagy, they were never popular within the Party itself, never mind the wider population. Yet, with Stalin’s support, they were enabled to remain in power until 1953, and were even, briefly, restored to power by the Kremlin in 1955. A recent publication in translation of the memoirs of the Hungarian diplomat, Domokos Szent-Iványi, has revealed how, prior to his arrest and imprisonment in 1946, he had made plans to replace them with General Pálffi-Oesterreicher, the head of the dreaded military police, who had had him arrested and placed him in ‘a very small and very dirty hole of a dungeon’ under the police headquarters:

During our conversations I did my best to convince ‘Pálfi’ that the greatest evil to the Hungarian people, to the country, and even to the Communists and the Soviet Union consisted in the policy and machinations of Rákosi and of his gang, and seemingly I succeeded in my efforts in this respect. The execution of Rajk, Szebeny and Pálffy-Oesterreicher seemingly strengthened Rákosi’s position. This, however, was not so. The ruthless liquidation of old Communist Party members was one of the main acts which some years later led to Rákosi’s downfall.

The light-mindedness of Pálffy-Oesterreicher contributed to his own downfall and put my life in peril also. It happened once that Pálffi, sending one of his collaborators, … made the grave error of instructing this man to tell me that “the pact between Pálffi and Szent-Iványi is still effective”.    

In the course of the Rajk trial, my name and that of the “conspirators” were brought up by the prosecution, and Szebeny, Rajk’s Secretary of State, made a statement to the effect that the Rajk-Pálffi group sympathised with the so-called conspirators with whom they intended to co-operate “as soon as the Rákosi gang are out of power”. Rózsa, a young man (whom Pálffy had used as a go-between with Szent-Iványi in prison) … then reported this affair to Rákosi and the consequences as we know were very grave for all parties involved.

Right after the arrest of Rajk, Szebeny, Pálffy-Oesterreicher and many of their followers, I was locked up in a single cell in the so-called “Death Section” of Gyüjtő Prison where those prisoners were kept who were to be executed. … an old Communist Party member whispered to me in the silence … that I was there due to the Rajk case. Among the many indictments brought up against Rajk and Pálfi, their contacts with me and “the conspirators” had particular weight.

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Szent-Iványi argued that the reaction to the Rajk trial, among others, demonstrated that the Hungarian people were sharply opposed to any Soviet policy which was carried out by  Rákosi, Gérő and others in the pro-Moscow leadership. Yet, until Rajk’s rehabilitation in 1955 and especially his re-burial on 6th October, which amounted to the first open demonstration against the Rákosi régime, there was little that could effectively be done to bring it down, either from inside prison or on the outside. He later reflected on the reasons for this:

This was a most distressing time, dominated by man at his most vengeful, envious and cruel.

Revenge and hatred was harboured by all kinds, prisoners and guards alike. Ex-soldiers who had endured the cruelties and horrors of battles, hated those who had lived peacefully in their own homes. … Jewish guards and Jewish prisoners hated their Gentile neighbours for their past suffering. Ex-Arrow-Cross members (fascists) were hated by Communists and Jews. It is strange that the common criminals in general hated nobody; they wanted money and ultimately did not hate their victims … but I could believe that they themselves had some kind of sympathy for their victims, like Tyrrell in Richard III.

Hatred was born of emotions and passion, and emotions had too many times intruded into Hungarian political life also, leading the country and its people to tragedy.

During my detention and prison years I had time to think and ponder over the political blunders, emotions and in particular the passions, of bygone years. Szálasi (the ‘Arrow Cross’ Premier in 1944-45) and Rákosi can be considered as typical examples of authors of such blunders. Both men felt that they were not popular in the country and that they had just a small fraction of the population behind them. In consequence they needed support from abroad. Szalási found his support in Hitlerite Germany, and in consequence adopted Nazi political principles and methods. These include Anti-Semitism and a “foreign policy” against the Allied Powers. Rákosi got the necessary support in Stalin-Beria run Soviet Russia and based his interior policy on revenge and jealousy. His vanity could not tolerate differences of opinion, whether outside the Communist Party … or inside the Party … Wherever he found opposition to his policy or to his person he set out to liquidate real or imaginary opponents.

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Above: Lavrenti Pavlovich Beria (1899-1953). When he began to think of himself as Stalin’s successor, the other members of the Politburo were alarmed that he might attempt to seize power following Stalin’s death. He was arrested, tried in his absence, and shot some time before December 1953, when his death was announced.

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The lack of popular support for Rákosi and his dependence on Stalin and Beria was clearly demonstrated by the establishment of the first Imre Nagy government following Stalin’s death in 1953. Although Moscow then replaced the initial Nagy government by one headed by Gérő and Rákosi, the latter was finally ousted by them in July 1956. Although the subsequent Uprising was put down by the invasion of the Soviet Union under Khrushchev, Szent-Iványi was at pains to point out in his memoirs that the Soviet Union finally dropped the Stalinist leadership of Hungary and that the Kádár régime (János Kádár, left) which it installed was one which was able to win the confidence of both the Hungarian people and of the Soviet Union, bringing peace to the country and its inhabitants.

Szent-Iványi reflected on how the life of the prisoners he had witnessed and experienced under the Rákosi régime, including health conditions, food, and fresh air had steadily worsened until it was impacted by these events:

The fact that some of the prisoners were able to survive was down to two causes; firstly, the honest among the jailers, in the majority of Hungarian peasant stock, did their best to alleviate the sufferings of the prisoners as well as to improve upon the harsh and very often cruel conditions imposed by Rákosi’s régime upon political prisoners; secondly, the death of Stalin and the elimination of Beria in 1953 … The most important “innovation” was that after more than a full year or so, the daily walks for prisoners as prescribed by law were resumed. Under the more humane régime of Premier Imre Nagy further improvements took place. And two years later prisoners were released in increasing numbers. By 1956 … many of the political prisoners were already outside the prison walls or were preparing to be released.Without these two factors, few prisoners would have survived the prison system after ten or twelve years of endless suffering.

007

Szent-Iványi was himself released in mid-September, five weeks before what he called ‘the October Revolution’. But, contrary to the claims of the pro-Rákosi faction’s claims, neither he nor the ex-political-prisoners played a major role in the events, which I have covered in great detail elsewhere. Even the hated ÁVO, the Secret Police, admitted that none of the “Conspirators” of 1946-48 had actively participated in the Revolution and that…

… the blame has remained firmly on the shoulders of the provocateurs, the Rákosi-Hegedüs-Gerő gang which, of course, greatly contributed to the stability and success of the Kádár regime. … The dictatorship of Rákosi and his gang had no other support than the bayonets of the Red Army or rather the power of the Russian Communist Party and of the Red Army.

With real and imaginary political opponents exterminated, the next phase of Stalinisation in Czechoslovakia was a purge of the Communist Party itself. One out of every four Czechoslovak party members was removed. Stalin wanted to make an example of one highly placed ‘comrade’, Rudolf Slánsky, the general secretary of the Czech Communist Party, who was then leading a security purge within it. Stalin personally ordered Klement Gottwald, who had replaced Eduard Benes as President of the country, to arrest Slánsky. When Gottwald hesitated, Stalin sent General Alexei Beschastnov and two ‘assistants’ to Prague. Gottwald gave in. On 21 November 1951, Slánsky was arrested. In this case, there was a new ingredient in the Moscow mix: Slánsky and ten of the other high-ranking Czechoslovak party members arrested at that time were Jews.

The case against Slánsky was based on Stalin’s fear of an imagined Zionist, pro-Western conspiracy. Stalin appeared to believe that there was a conspiracy led by American Jewish capitalists and the Israeli government to dominate the world and to wage a new war against communism. This represented a complete turnaround by Stalin on Israel. The Soviet Union had supported the struggle of the Zionists against the Palestinian Arabs and had supplied them, through Czechoslovakia, with essential weapons in 1947 and 1948. The Soviet Union was the first state to recognise de jure the state of Israel, within minutes of its birth in May 1948. Two years later, perhaps fearful of Israel’s appeal to the hundreds of thousands of Russian Jews, and suspicious of its close ties to the United States, Stalin became convinced that Israel was in the vanguard of an international Jewish conspiracy against him.

011Slánsky was, in fact, a loyal Stalinist. But he was forced to confess that, due to his bourgeois and Jewish origins, he had never been a true Communist and that he was now an American spy. Slánsky and his co-accused were told that their sacrifice was for the party’s good. Their confessions were written out in detail by Soviet advisers in Prague, and each of the accused was carefully rehearsed for his “performance” at the trial to come. They had time to learn their “confessions” by heart, for preparations took a year. In November 1952, the show trial began. One by one, Slánsky and the others confessed to the most absurd charges made against them by their former associates.

Public prosecutor Josef Urvalek read out the indictment, condemning the gang of traitors and criminals who had infiltrated the Communist Party on behalf of an evil pro-Zionist, Western conspiracy. It was now time, he said, for the people’s vengeance. The accused wondered how Urvalek could fein such conviction. The ‘defence’ lawyers admitted that the evidence against their clients confirmed their guilt. In his last statement, Slánsky said, “I deserve no other end to my criminal life but that proposed by the Public Prosecutor.” Others stated, “I realise that however harsh the penalty – and whatever it is, it will be just – I will never be able to make up for the damage I have caused”; “I beg the state tribunal to appreciate and condemn my treachery with the maximum severity and firmness.” Eleven were condemned to death; three were sentenced to life imprisonment. When the sentences were announced, the court was silent. No one could be proud of what had been done. A week later, Slánsky and the other ten were executed.

010

Absolute rule demanded absolute obedience, but it helped if people loved their leader rather than feared him. In the Soviet Union, the cult of Stalin was omnipresent. In the picture on the left above, Stalin appears as the ‘Father of His People’ during the Great Patriotic War, and on the right, world Communist leaders gathered in the Bolshoi Theatre to celebrate Stalin’s seventieth birthday on 21st December 1949. Stalin treated the whole of Central/Eastern Europe as his domain, with the leaders of the Communist parties as his ‘vassals’, obliged to carry out his instructions without question. When he died on March 1953, the new spirit which emerged from the Kremlin caused nervousness among the various ‘mini-Stalins’ who held power, largely due to his support. In the Soviet zone of Germany, control was in the hands of Walter Ulbricht, a hard-line Stalinist of the old school who had spent most of the era of the Third Reich in Moscow. One of Stalin’s most loyal lieutenants, he had begun, in the summer of 1952, the accelerated construction of socialism in East Germany, aimed at building a strict command economy. A huge programme of farm collectivisation was started, along with a rush towards Soviet-style industrialisation, with great emphasis on heavy industry at the expense of consumer goods. Stalin had intended to force the East German economy to complement that of the Soviet Union, to supply the USSR with iron and steel, of which it was in desperate need. Ulbricht allowed no opposition inside East Germany. His secret police, the ‘Stasi’, were everywhere, urging friends to inform on friends, workers on fellow-workers.

007

Ulbricht was therefore uneasy with the changes taking place in Moscow. In May 1953, the collective leadership in the Kremlin summoned him to Moscow. For some time, the Kremlin had been considering a review of its German policy, supporting the idea of a re-unified but neutral Germany. The Soviets had no hope of controlling all of Germany, but a neutral Germany would at least prevent the western half, with its huge industrial base, from becoming a permanent part of the Western bloc. The Kremlin encouraged Ulbricht to follow a new course of liberalisation and to ease the pace of enforced industrialisation. But Ulbricht ignored the advice, and in June imposed new work quotas on industrial workers, demanding higher productivity without any increase in pay. Angry at their expectations being dashed, East German workers erupted in protests calling for a lifting of the new quotas. As their employer was the state, industrial protest over work norms soon became a political demand for free elections and a call for a general strike. The American radio station in West Berlin, RIAS, publicised the demands and reported that there would be major demonstrations the following day. On 17 June protests took place in East Berlin, Leipzig, Dresden, Magdeburg, and all the major towns of East Germany.

006

Over the next four days, more than 400,000 German workers took to the streets. Ulbricht and his unpopular government were terrified by this vast, spontaneous display of worker power. But the demonstrations lacked any central direction or coherent organisation. Beria called on the Soviet tank units stationed all over East Germany to confront the strikers, to prevent the Ulbricht régime from collapsing. He told the Soviet high command “not to spare bullets” in suppressing the rising, and forty workers were killed, more than four hundred wounded. When thousands of strike leaders were arrested, the demonstrations ended as suddenly as they had begun. Ulbricht had learned a lesson and in time acceded to many of the workers’ economic demands. There were also anti-government riots in Czechoslovakia, and strikes in Hungary and Romania. There was even a prisoners’ strike in Siberia.

011

The Soviets saw behind these events a well-orchestrated campaign to undermine the Soviet Union and its allies, part of the “rollback” policy of the new Eisenhower administration, which had replaced the Truman Doctrine of 1947. The United States ‘suggested’ openly that it would now take the initiative in ‘rolling back’ communism wherever possible. The architect of this new, more ‘aggressive’ policy in support of ‘freedom’ movements in Eastern Europe was the new Secretary of State, John Foster Dulles, who proclaimed a new era of liberty, not enslavement. He added that…

… the Eisenhower era begins as the Stalin era ends. … For ten years the world has been dominated by the malignant power of Stalin. Now Stalin is dead. He cannot bequeath to anyone his prestige. 

004

The British prime minister, Winston Churchill, had written to Eisenhower suggesting a meeting with Malenkov in case both of us together or separately be called to account if no attempt were made to turn over a new leaf. But for the moment Eisenhower had ruled out any direct meeting with the new Soviet leadership. In reality, it was never clear how this new policy could be put into practice, especially in Europe, without provoking a direct confrontation. On 16 April 1953, Eisenhower had made a speech in which he called on the Kremlin to demonstrate that it had broken with Stalin’s legacy by offering “concrete evidence” of a concern for peace. He had appeared to be holding out an olive branch, hoping the Kremlin would grab it. His ‘Chance for Peace’ speech had been widely reported in the Soviet Union and throughout Central/Eastern Europe, raising hopes of ‘a thaw’ in the Cold War.

Only two days later, however, Dulles spoke in much harsher terms, declaring we are not dancing to any Russian tune. A secret report for the National Security Council had also concluded that the Soviet interest in peace was illusory, but at the same time that any military confrontation would be long drawn out. But Radio Free Europe continued to promise American assistance for resistance to Soviet control in its broadcasts into the satellite countries. In doing so, it was promising more than the West was willing or able to deliver. In Hungary in 1956, these ‘mixed messages’ were to have tragic consequences.

005

The power struggle in the Kremlin now reached a new intensity. Molotov continued to see the Cold War as an ideological conflict in which the capitalist system would ultimately destroy itself, and his diplomacy exploited the differences he perceived between the United States and its Western European allies. However, for Malenkov and Beria, the conflict was viewed in strictly practical terms.

017

First of all, the Cold War was an arms race. Stalin had quickly realized how important it was to break the US atomic monopoly and in 1945 had put Beria in charge of the Soviet atom bomb project. In the summer of 1949, several years ahead of the West’s predictions, the first Soviet bomb had been successfully tested. After Stalin’s death, Beria took more direct control of the Soviet nuclear project, ordering scientists to race ahead with developing a hydrogen bomb to rival America’s thermonuclear weapons. If Soviet strength rested on ever more powerful nuclear weapons and he was in charge of developing them, Beria calculated, then he would control the mainsprings of Soviet power. But this sort of arrogance was no longer acceptable inside the Kremlin. Within days of the quelling of the rising in East Germany, Khrushchev became convinced that Beria was preparing to make a grab for absolute power. Malenkov denounced Beria at a meeting of the Presidium. Forever tainted from heading Stalin’s terror apparatus, Beria was arrested on trumped-up charges of being a Western agent. In what to many seemed a just reversal of fate, the man who had sent hundreds to their deaths was not even allowed to attend his own trial. He was found guilty and shot. His removal marked a huge shift in the power balance within the Kremlin, but he was the only Soviet leader at this juncture whose fate was settled by a bullet.

005

During the next two years, Khrushchev simply out-manoeuvred his remaining rivals to become the new leader. In September 1954 he visited Beijing to repair the damage to Sino-Soviet relations resulting from the Korean War, agreeing to new trade terms that were far more beneficial to the Chinese than they had been under Stalin. In Europe, Khrushchev negotiated a farsighted agreement with Austria. Soviet troops, occupying part of the country since the end of the war, were withdrawn in return for an Austrian commitment to neutrality. In May 1955 a state treaty was signed in Vienna by the four occupying powers, and Austria remained neutral throughout the Cold War. In the same month, he also made a dramatic visit to Yugoslavia to try to “bury the hatchet” with Tito. However, he was not so pleased when, also in May, the Western Allies formally ended their occupation of West Germany, and the Federal Republic was admitted to NATO. The response of Moscow to this setback was the creation of the Warsaw Pact, a formal military alliance of all the ‘satellite’ states with the Soviet Union and each other. The Pact was really no more than a codification of the existing military dominance of the USSR over Central/Eastern Europe, but it did signify the completion of the division of Europe into two rival camps.

003

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The rejection of Stalinism and the widespread acceptance of the new process of reform culminated in the Twentieth Congress of the Soviet Communist Party in Moscow in February 1956. This was not merely a Soviet Russian affair, as delegates from throughout the Communist world, and from non-aligned movements involved in “liberation struggles” with colonial powers were invited to Moscow. In his set-piece speech, Khrushchev challenged the conventional Marxist/Leninist view that war between communism and capitalism was inevitable. Then, on the last day of the Congress, Khrushchev called all the Soviet delegates together in a closed session. For six hours, he denounced Stalin’s ‘reign of terror’ and its crimes, going back to the purges of the 1930s. The speech was never intended to remain secret; copies were immediately made available to party officials and to foreign Communist parties. News of the speech spread by word of mouth to millions of citizens within the Soviet bloc. Washington also acquired a copy of the text through the CIA and Mossad, Israeli intelligence. It was passed on to the press and appeared in Western newspapers in June 1956. The Eisenhower administration was convinced that genuine change was taking place in the Soviet Union; the Chinese, on the other hand, were deeply offended. In Eastern Europe, many Communist party leaders, gravely upset by the impact, were concerned for the continued stability of their authoritarian régimes.

002

Two months after the Party Congress, the Kremlin dissolved the Cominform, the organisation that Stalin had created in 1947 to impose his orthodoxy over the satellites. Molotov was dismissed as foreign minister and banished to Mongolia as Soviet ambassador. A loyal supporter of Stalin throughout his career, Molotov had been firmly opposed to any reconciliation with Tito, but now the door was open again. Tito made a state visit to Moscow in June 1956, amidst much pomp. Nothing could have been more symbolic of the new Soviet attitude towards Eastern Europe. But how far would the Soviets be prepared to go in relaxing its influence there?  In both Poland and Hungary, now released from the yoke of Stalinist rule after almost a decade down at heel, people wanted more control than ever over their own individual lives and their national identities and destinies.

 

Sources:

Jeremy Isaacs (1998), Cold War. London: Bantam Press (Transworld Publishers).

Mark Almond, Jeremy Black, et.al. (2003), The Times History of Europe. London: Times Books (Harper Collins Publishers).

Gyula Kodolányi & Nóra Szekér (eds.) (2013), Domokos Szent-Iványi: The Hungarian Independence Movement, 1939-46. Budapest: Hungarian Review Books.

 

Posted June 3, 2018 by TeamBritanniaHu in American History & Politics, Arab-Israeli Conflict, Austerity, Austria-Hungary, Baltic States, Britain, British history, Cartoons, Christian Faith, Christianity, Church, Churchill, Civilization, Cold War, Communism, Conquest, decolonisation, Empire, English Language, Europe, Factories, Family, First World War, France, Gentiles, Germany, Hungarian History, Hungary, Israel, Jews, Journalism, Marxism, Mediterranean, Middle East, Mythology, Narrative, nationalisation, nationalism, Oxford, Palestine, Population, Poverty, Russia, Satire, Second World War, Serbia, terror, terrorism, tyranny, United Nations, USA, USSR, War Crimes, Warfare, World War One, World War Two, Zionism

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Early Modern English: The Fifteenth Century   Leave a comment

Above: The Pastons’ House in Norwich (photo rights: A J Chandler, 2015)

The East Midland Dialect:

It is usually possible to make sense of late Medieval documents written in the east Midland and London dialects because they provide the basis for Standard English as written today. The fifteenth century was a period of transition to modern English (MnE), so we talk of the period from about 1450 as marking the development of ‘Early Modern English’ (EMnE).

In reality, the transition has its identifiable origins in the East Midlands dialect of the early fifteenth century. Margery Kempe (c. 1373-1439) was from King’s Lynn in Norfolk, who gave up on married life as a result of her mystical experiences in order to devote herself to pilgrimage. In the 1420s, she dictated a book describing her visions, temptations and journeys. As the text was dictated, it provides reliable evidence of ordinary speech at that time. The dialect is east Midland, but we cannot tell how accurate the scribe’s reproduction of Margery’s speech actually was, especially as the only surviving manuscript was copied in mid-century. Here is her description of her marriage in verbatim translation:

When this creature was twenty years of age or something more she was married to a worshipful burgess of Lynn and was with child within short time as nature wills. And after that she had conceived she was in labour with great fevers till the child was born and then what for labour she had in childbirth and for sickness going before she despaired of her life, thinking she might not live…

The opening of the book is shown in facsimile below, and given in transcription here:

001

Here begynnyth a schort tretys and a comfortabyl for sinful wrecchys, wher in thei may haue gret solas and comfort to hem, and vryndyrstonyn the hy and vnspe cabyl mercy of ower soueryn Sauyowr cryst Ihesu whoe name be worschept and magnyfyed wythowten ende. That now in ower days to vs unworthy deyneth to exercysen hys nobeley and hys goodnesse.

The Pastons were a prosperous family who also lived in Norfolk (see photo above). A large collection of their letters written between the 1420s and 1500s have survived. The letters cover three generations of the family and are a valuable source of evidence for historians as well as students of language development. Much of the period was troubled by the political upheavals of the Wars of the Roses, reflected in the letters. As well as letters from Agnes Paston to her husband William, the collection includes a valentine letter from Margery Brews to the third generation John Paston, written in 1477, partly in rhyme. They were married later that year:

…and if ye commande me to kepe me true where euer I go

iwyse I will do all my might zowe to love and neuer no mo

and yf my freendys say that I do amys thei thei shall not me let for to do

myn herte me byddys euer more to love zowe truly ouer all erthely thing

and yf thei be neuer so wroth I tryst it schall be bettur in tyme commyng

no more to yowe at this tyme but the holy trinite hafe yowe in kepyng and I besech zowe that this bill be not seyn of non erthely creature safe only zour selfe…

…be zour own MB

(Paston Letters and Papers of the Fifteenth Century, Norman Davis (ed.), OUP, 1971)

 

The London Dialect:

William Caxton was the first English printer, setting up his printing press in London in 1476. It began a revolution in the production of books, which no longer had to be copied individually by hand. Of course, copying did not die out completely, and Caxton was more than just a printer of other people’s writing. He also translated and edited many of the books printed, providing a large number of prefaces and commentaries.

In 1482, Caxton printed a revised text of Trevisa’s 1385 translation of Higden’s Polychronicon. This provides an excellent example of some of the changes in the language which had taken place over the hundred years between the two editions. Caxton found Trevisa’s language old-fashioned and out of date, as he said in an epilogue:

William Caxton a symple persone have endeuoyred me to wryte fyrst overall the sayd book of ’Proloconycon’ and somewhat have chaunged the rude and old Englyssh, that is to wete certayn wordes which in these dayes be neither vsyd ne vnderstanden.

Caxton’s modernised version of John of Trevisa’s description of the languages of Britain shows some interesting differences with the original texts. It illustrates the lack of standardisation in Middle English and the way in which differences in the dialects of ME were reflected in writing.

A standard form of a language develops in a nation or society only when the need becomes evident and pressing. The invention of printing was one factor in the complex of political and economic changes in England by the end of the fifteenth century, which led in time to acceptance of the educated London dialect as the basis of Standard English.

One of Caxton’s problems as printer and translator is clearly illustrated in a famous story that he tells in the preface to his translation of a French version of Virgil’s Latin poem The Aeneid, called Eneydos. A revolution in communications was brought about by the printing of books. A book might be bought and sold anywhere in the country, but which dialect of English should the printer use? For example, there were at least two words for egg, the one in OE and the other from ON. The story is about the difficulty of asking for eggs for breakfast, but for Caxton it illustrates the problem of choosing a language in translation:

Loo what sholde a man in thyse dayes nowe write, egges or eyren?

This was just one of the problems that needed to be resolved in the agreement of a standard literary form of English over the next two centuries. If you examine Caxton’s language in detail, you notice that he did not devise a regular spelling system, and that many of his decisions about spelling and grammar were already out of date by the 1480s. Below is a very short example of Caxton’s printing. It is an advertisement, dating from about 1478, from Caxton’s edition of the Sarum Ordinal, the book of church services for Salisbury:   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                 026

If it plese ony man spirituel or temporal to bye ony pyes of two and thre comemoracios of salisburi use enpryntid after the forme of this preset letter whiche ben wel and truly correct, late hym come to westmo nester in to the almonesrye at the reed pale and he shal haue them good chepe

Supplico stet cedula

In 1485, Caxton published a noble and joyous book, entytled ‘Le Morte Darthur’. He described it in these words:

… a book of the noble hystoryes of the sayd Kynge Arthur and of certeyn of his knyghtes after a copy unto me delivered. Whyche copye Syr Thomas Malorye dyd take oute of certeyn books of frensshe ad reduced it into Englysshe.

Malory made his translations and adaptations from French while in prison. He wrote the following at the end of one of the books making up the collection:

And I pray you all that redyth this tale to pray for hym that this wrote, that God sende hym good delyveraunce sone and hastely. Amen

Malory died in prison in 1471. Caxton’s printed book was the only known version of Malory’s legends of King Arthur until 1934, when a manuscript was found in the Fellows’ Library of Winchester College. It was not in Malory’s own hand, but more authentic than Caxton’s book, which has many alterations and omissions. Below is a facsimile of the opening of the fourth story, The War with the Five Kings, in the first of the manuscript books, The Tale of King Arthur:

027

The first six lines of the facsimile were written by the principal scribe, while the rest was written by a second scribe. Not only is the handwriting clearly different, but so too is the spelling.

A collection of letters and memoranda of the Cely family, written in the 1470s and 1480s, gives us authentic handwritten evidence of London English a century after that of Thomas Usk’s, and contemporary with the Paston letters. The Celys were wool merchants, or staplers. They bought fleeces in and sold them to merchants in Calais and Bruges. The letters and accounts provide historians with primary evidence about the workings of a medieval English business, and give students of language examples of late medieval commercial English, as well as evidence of the speech and writing habits of the London merchant classes of the period.

The collection contains letters written by forty different people. Most are from two generations of the Cely family, father and sons. Like the Paston letters, they show that there was as yet no standardised written English. The spelling is not good evidence for the pronunciation of spoken English, partly because we do not know the sounds given to each letter, but also because the spelling of each of the authors was so irregular. Individual writers show many inconsistencies of spelling. The following text is not a letter, but a note of political events and rumours in the troubled times leading to the deposition of Edward V and the accession of the Duke of Gloucester as Richard III. The first five items are written as facts; the rest, beginning with if are rumours. As jotted down notes, they are not always grammatically clear:

There is great romber* in the realm, The Scots has done great in England. (The Lord) Chamberlain is deceased in trouble. The Chancellor is disproved* and not content. The Bishop of Ely is dead.

If the King, God save his life, were deceased. (If) the Duke of Gloucester were in any peril. If my Lord Prince were, God defend, were troubled*. If my Lord of Northumberland were ded or greatly troubled. If my Lord Howard were slain.

From monsieur Saint John

(*romber = disturbance/ upheaval; disproved = proved false; troubled = molested.)

Lord Hastings, the Lord Chamberlain, had been executed in June 1483. The Chancellor was Thomas Rotherham, Archbishop of York. ‘My lord prinsse’ was the Duke of York, Edward V’s brother. The Earl of Northumberland and John Howard were supporters of the Duke of Gloucester; ‘movnsewr sent jonys’ is a pseudonym, to disguise the name of Sir John Weston, from whom George Cely got the rumours.

Source:

Dennis Freeborn  (1992), From Old English to Standard English. Basingstoke: MacMillan.

Hungary and the White Rose: The Plantagenet Pretender in Buda   1 comment

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After thirty years of war, the Wars of the Roses came to an end in 1485.  During the Battle of Bosworth Field (Leicestershire), in which the issue was decided, the gold crown which had, supposedly, fallen from the head of Richard III, was placed on that of Henry Tudor, who, as Henry VII, was the new Welsh master of England’s destiny. In 1489, ambassadors and diplomats from all parts of Europe were in England and, as one of King Matthias’ biographers tells us, the King of Hungary was among those who sent envoys to Henry’s Court. Henry VII was supposed to have made peace with the House of York when he married Elizabeth of York, thus enabling the red and white roses to bloom side by side. At least, this was the Tudor mythology, alongside the naming of Henry’s eldest son and heir as Arthur, symbolising the rising again of the Red Dragon of the ancient King of the Britons. But Henry knew he was far from secure, and it is only with hindsight that 1485 is seen as the key date in the transition from Medieval combat to Early Modern statesmanship. Henry had won the crown by force, not legitimacy, just as his Lancastrian ancestors had, albeit from a usurper, whom many regarded as a tyrant, another myth which Shakespeare later made a part of English staged folklore. At the time, and at any suitable moment in it, Henry knew that the House of York might again seize the throne they still laid claim to. No regular order of succession had been established, and it was might rather than right which would keep the Tudors in contention to establish a dynasty. During the first years of his reign he was disturbed by two insurrections, one headed by the Earl of Lincoln, with Lambert Simnel as its figurehead, and the other headed by Perkin Warbeck.

Following the Wars of the Roses and the final defeat of the Yorkist cause at the Battle of Stoke Field in 1487, the last of the Plantagenets claimants to the throne, Richard de la Pole, sought refuge at the Court of Ladislas II of Hungary (1490-1516). In 1508 the last hope of the Yorkists spent a few months in Buda. This pretender to the throne of England was related to the Queen of Hungary, Ladislas’ wife. His story is but one tragic chapter in the final denouement of the Plantagenets.

Richard’s grandfather, William de la Pole, had been imprisoned in the Tower of London and then exiled by Henry VI. He was murdered on his ship in the Channel and his body was washed ashore near Dover in 1450. His wife, Alice, brought his body home. No doubt embittered by his treatment, she continued to consolidate the family’s estates, perhaps fatefully, by abandoning their Lancastrian connections and building up their Yorkist ones. John de la Pole was grandson of William and Alice, and eldest son of the first Duke of Suffolk, the elder John de la Pole (d. 1491), and Elizabeth Plantagenet of York. He was therefore in direct line to the throne.  Elizabeth’s brother was Edward IV, and it was he who made her son John, Earl of Lincoln. Edward had married Elizabeth Woodville, whose two sons, Edward V and Richard Duke of York were imprisoned in the Tower of London when Richard of Gloucester had the Woodville marriage declared illegal, thus enabling him to usurp the young king whose ’protector’ he had been. When Richard III lost his only son, the Earl of Lincoln became ’de facto’ the next Yorkist in line to the throne. Although never clearly declaring him as his successor, Richard gave him the revenues of the Duchy of Cornwall, titles reserved for the heir. Lincoln fought for Richard at Bosworth Field, surviving the battle. Following the ’Tudor Takeover’, both Lincoln and his father, Suffolk, at first made peace with Henry VII, who visited them at their manor in Oxfordshire to reassure them of his goodwill towards the family.

However, Lincoln was then introduced to Lambert Simnel, and a plot began to form by which he hoped to secure the throne for the Yorkists, perhaps himself. Simnel bore a striking resemblance to the young Edward, Earl of Warwick. Edward was born (in 1475) as Edward Plantagenet, to George, Duke of Clarence and Lady Isabel Neville, elder daughter of the 16th Earl of Warwick. Richard Neville, ’The Kingmaker’, who had eventually been killed in battle in 1471, had no sons, so Richard III had Neville’s grandson created Earl of Warwick in 1478 and knighted at York in 1483. On seizing the Crown on the battlefield at Bosworth in 1485, Henry had re-imprisoned the boy in the Tower, where he had already spent much of his young life, hence the possibility of impersonation.

Lambert Simnel was the son of an Oxford carpenter. Henry’s enemies had proclaimed him as Edward Plantagenet, escaped from the Tower. The Yorkists rallied around him, and when they felt strong enough, they recruited an army to support his claim. However, early in 1487, when he first heard of the plot, all Henry VII had to do was to produce the real Earl of Warwick. As the Plantagenet heir, Warwick would have possessed a stronger claim to the throne than both Henry and Lincoln, and was only prevented from acceding to the throne by the act of attainder by which Richard had usurped it. With Richard deposed, Lincoln knew that Parliament could easily be persuaded to change its mind and reinstate the boy’s claim, or Henry would be forced to disclose that Edward V and Richard Duke of York were no longer alive. Lincoln may have known this himself, especially if they had died on the orders of Richard III, since he had been Richard’s heir. To scotch the rumours of Warwick’s escape from the Tower, put about by Lincoln’s supporters, Henry had the boy paraded through the streets of London, but Lincoln had already fled before Henry could force him to recognise the real Earl or reveal his treachery.  Some historians have suggested that this shows that Lincoln was intending to take the throne for himself. He raised an army of German mercenaries in Burgundy, with the help of Margaret, the sister of Edward IV, and landed in Ireland. Margaret then declared Simnel to be her nephew and Lincoln told of how he had personally rescued the boy from the Tower. He was proclaimed and crowned in Dublin, by its Archbishop, as Edward VI, at the end of May 1487. Having acquired Irish troops, led by Sir Thomas Fitzgerald, Lincoln  landed in Lancashire on 4th June and marched his troops to York, covering two hundred miles in five days. However, the city, normally a Yorkist stronghold, refused to yield to him, perhaps because they did not wish to be governed by a king, even a Yorkist, who depended on German and Irish mercenaries. Gathering troops on the way from Coventry to Nottingham, the Tudor king met Lincoln’s forces on their way to Newark. Although the Germans under the command of  Martin Schwartz fought with great valour, Fitzgerald, Lincoln and Schwartz were all killed, together with over four thousand of their men, at the Battle of Stoke on 16th June, 1487.

Despite the fact that the last surviving legitimate male Plantagenet claimant to the throne, the Earl of Warwick, had died on the scaffold in 1499, the de la Poles did not give up their claim to the throne. Lincoln had two younger brothers, Edmund and Richard. Both laid claim to the throne and both had a strong following at home, and could count on support from abroad.  Suffolk died and was succeeded by his second son Edmund, in 1491. He was demoted to the rank of earl by Henry VII and fled abroad in 1501, prompting the seizure of his estates. He sought to enforce what he saw as his rightful claim with the aid of the Emperor Maximillian,making his way to the Tyrol to visit the Emperor, who at first showed great readiness to support him. Later on, however, he became reconciled with Henry, and concluded a treaty with Henry in which he undertook not to support the pretender in exchange for ten thousand pounds. Meanwhile, Edmund had gone to Aachen, where he was followed by his brother Richard. Financial troubles weighed heavily on the two brothers, despite the considerable sum allowed them by Maximillian to settle their debts. Formally attainted in 1504, after various adventures Edmund was captured by Henry in 1506 and was sent to the Tower.  He was not immediately executed, for Henry had given pledges to the King of France for his safety. Although Louis had repeatedly given aid to Henry’s enemies, he was so powerful that the King of England had to respect his wishes. So long as Henry VII lived, Edmund was safe, but when Henry VIII succeeded him and Richard attempted, with the aid of France, to raise a rebellion against the second Tudor king, Edmund was executed in 1513.

Even then, Plantagenet resistance did not come to an end. Richard had fled with Edmund to the continent and joined his brother in Aachen in 1504, where they had lived in poverty, constantly harassed by Edmund’s creditors following his attainder. Richard, however, managed to secure the protection of Erard de la Marck, Bishop of Liege, who delivered him from his straitened and dangerous circumstances. It was at this point, following his brother’s arrest, that he went to Hungary, where he lived for a time at the Court of Ladislas II. This must have been because of his ties of kinship with the Royal Family of Hungary. Ladislas II’s consort, Anna, was related to the King of France and also to the de la Pole family. When the plan of his marriage to Anna was first broached, Ladislas thought she was an English princess, which by right she may have been, had the Plantagenets been restored to the throne. This belief was also held by those who were misled by the Queen of Hungary’s relationship with the de la Poles. Indeed, the English ambassador, Salisbury, had been present at Anna’s coronation at Székesfehérvár. Henry VII must have been worried by the presence of Richard de la Pole, the last pretender, in Buda, as he sent an envoy to Ladislas, asking him to surrender Richard. This Ladislas refused to do, instead lending financial aid to his English guest.

According to a note in the diary of Marino Sanuto, the ‘White Rose’ arrived in Buda on 6 October 1506, and we know of a letter dated 14 April 1507 addressed to the Bishop of Liege from Richard. From these two documents, we know that Richard must have been in Hungary for at least six months. However, few details are known of his sojourn. We know that Thomas Killingworth, the loyal steward of the de la Pole family had settled Edmund’s financial matters in the Tyro and also attended to Richard’s affairs in Buda. It seems that Richard left Buda in 1507, first for Austria and then for France. In 1512, when England was again at war with France, When Edmund was beheaded in 1513, Richard took the title of Earl of Suffolk and from that time on openly laid claim to the throne of England. King Louis XII formally recognised Richard as the legitimate King of England, at Lyons, supporting his cause with men and money. In 1519 he sent Richard to Prague to plead on his behalf, in vain, to the young King Louis II of Hungary, and he also made preparations for an invasion of England in 1522-23, during another Anglo-French war. However, the invasion did not happen and Richard never set foot in England again. On 24 February 1525, he was killed at the Battle of Pavia, fighting for the French King. There is a picture of him still preserved in Oxford bearing the inscription Le Duc de Susfoc dit Blanche Rose. 

Two further thorny White roses remained for the Tudors to deal with. Lady Katherine Gordon was Perkin Warbeck’s impoverished widow and a kinswoman of James IV of Scotland, who had been killed at the Battle of Flodden Field. Warbeck had pretended to be Edward, Duke of York, and was joined by many malcontents. He even received support from the King of Scotland, his relative, but was captured after a short time by Henry VII. He was imprisoned in the Tower and, when news of a fresh conspiracy reached Henry, he was hanged. Lady Catherine was granted permission to live at one of the confiscated Oxfordshire manors of the Pole family until death, provided that she did not visit Scotland or any other foreign country without licence. After Warbeck, she married three times more. She was known as The White Rose of York and Scotland, and died at the Oxfordshire manor in 1537, where she is buried together with her last husband.

The fact that all these pretenders managed to attract such powerful followings at home and abroad show how fragile the Tudor royal dynasty really was, descended through the illegitimate child of John of Gaunt. Indeed, Henry VIII’s paranoia of the Plantagenets led him to carry on a vindictive campaign against the Pole family after Cardinal Reginald Pole, the son of the Countess of Salisbury, Margaret Pole, penned a stinging attack against the King’s divorce, from exile in Italy. This resulted in the execution of one of his brothers in 1539 and the suicide of the other. Margaret, the daughter of the Duke of Clarence, was an old woman in 1541, once the governess to Mary Tudor, whose mother’s betrothal to Arthur, Prince of Wales, had caused the execution of her brother, Edward Plantagenet, the rival claimant to the throne. Despite this, she became a loyal Tudor courtier. However, because she was a Neville, she was accused of complicity in the Northern Rebellion, and sent to the Tower without trial. From there she was executed in May, after ten or eleven blows of the axe. When Mary became Queen, her son became the last Roman Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury. She herself was beatified by Pope Leo XIII in 1886. The extent of the reconciliation achieved by the end of the turbulent Tudor period is shown by the close friendship between Margaret’s granddaughter and Elizabeth I. However, descendants and relatives of the Poles continued to be implicated in, and executed for, plots against both Elizabeth and James I, the most significant being the Winter brothers in the 1605 ‘Gunpowder Plot’ and Midland Rebellion of the leading Catholic gentry.

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As for Hungary, Wladislas II’s  refusal to hand over Richard Plantagenet in 1506 was undoubtedly a factor in the refusal of the Tudors to lend support to Louis II in his fateful hour of need twenty years later.

Sources:

Most of the evidence for these articles on British-Hungarian history comes from the research of Sándor Fest (1883-1944) and his papers published in From Saint Margaret of Scotland to the Bards of WalesAnglo-Hungarian Historical and Literary Contacts (Universitas Kiadó, 2000). Fest was educated at the Eötvös College of Budapest University and became the first professor of English Studies at Budapest University in 1938. He was a pioneer in the study of Anglo-Hungarian historical and literary contacts, and generally promoted the cause of English studies in Hungarian higher education in the inter-war years. In doing so, he was swimming against the pro-German cultural tide which was beginning to swamp Hungary.

Most of the material for this volume had to be collected from scholarly publications and papers, some of them written in English, which are largely unavailable today.

In my recent articles on ‘the Bohemian Connection’, as well as this one, I have included material from my own researches, published online, into the Golafre/ Golliver/ Gulliver family, whose ‘fortunes’ were linked to the Plantagenets and Lancastrians from Richard II  to the Earl of Lincoln, John de la Pole, the elder brother of Edmund and Richard de la Pole, who was killed in battle at Stoke Field in 1487. According to the DNB, Lincoln’s second wife was a member of the Golafre family.

 

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